The country set to cash in on climate change

Record temperatures threaten traditional ways of life in Greenland but as the sea ice retreats, new mining, fishing and tourism investments possibilities are helping communities to adapt

Asked if he is fearful about the impact of climate change, Tnnes Kaka Berthelsens response is typical of many Greenlanders. We are more worried about the Maldives, he told bluntly.

Greenland has lived with extreme environmental changes for a decade or more. Sea ice is forming 2 months later and melting one month earlier. River fed by retreating glaciers are at record levels. And temperature records were smashed twice this year, with stunned meteorologists rechecking their measurings after 24 C was recorded in the capital, Nuuk, in June.

Traditional hunters are giving up their dog squads because there is three months less hunting on sea ice but climate change is no disaster, according to Berthelsen, the deputy manager of Knapk, Greenlands hunters and fishers association. The 56,000 dwellers of the largest island in the world that is not a continent must adapt, fast.

In the sea, new fish species are arriving. On land, the melting ice is set to uncover a wealth of zinc, iron, uranium, gold, and rare earth components that some predict is likely to be the largest deposits outside China.

Greenland believes that climate change will bequeath the wealth to win the ultimate political prize: full independence from Denmark. The country gained self-rule in 2009 but its economy is still sustained by a 3.2 bn kroner( 362 m) annual grant from its former colonial masters.

The vast majority more than 90% of Greenlands export income is from fish, and 2016 was the best ever year, according to Berthelsen. Greenlands pink gold, cold-water shrimp, is moving further north and new fish species mackerel, herring, cod and Atlantic bluefin tuna are entering the countrys waters. We havent considered such big cod stocks since the 1970 s, said Berthelsen.

But in the far north, climate change is hastening the decline of hunting. The traditional way of life is very challenged, said Bjarne Ababsi Lyberth, a biologist and hunting expert for the Association of Fishers and Hunters. People used to go hunting for weeks on the sea ice. They would go so far out they couldnt insure any land. Now they can traveling merely for one day by ocean ice, theres too much open water and its unstable.

Greenland has three climate forms polar, Arctic and sub-Arctic and the effects on the nation, its people and wildlife are varied. In the polar region, hunters report that polar bears havent changed much told Lyberth, and still look in good health. Further south, the bears have less body fat and are considered more frequently near villages, scavenging for food. Hunters also find it is impossible to store their meat in caches on the ice, as they once did, because hungry polar bears take it.

The changes that Europe and the rest of the world are becoming aware of have been going on in Greenland for 10 or 20 years, said Lyberth. Its not something that scares people. Its more a question of adapting.

Dog
Dog squads and Inuit hunters in Qaanaaq, Greenland, heading out in the spring during the period of the midnight sunshine. Photo: Louise Murray/ Alamy

Losing three months of sea ice means that hunters are getting rid of their puppy teams, which are expensive to feed and preserve, and switching to angling. But during the long wintertime darkness it is easier to hunt on ice with puppies than take a boat out fishing.

Climate change not only has an economic impact but an enormous impact on culture and how we are dealing with traditional lifestyles, told Aleqa Hammond, the countrys former “ministers “, the first female to be elected in 2013, and now a member of the Danish parliament.

Greenlanders are very good at assuring the new opportunities. We have simply refused to be victimised due to climate change. I am very optimistic. I find more positive options for the country than negatives. I wish that it wasnt happening but it is and thats a fact. Once its there you have an obligation to do the best out of it.

Lyberth gives the example of hunters forming small teams to target minke whales as an example of rapid adaptation: It involves skills and knowledge but the hunters are learning very quickly. But Hammond says investment is required to turn hunters into fishermen: Moving from hunting to fishing is not an easy task for many it requires quite a bit of investment both in equipment but also knowledge to ensure they will be capable of making a living as fishermen.

New processing facilities will be built in Greenland so it can export value-added cod fillets rather than the whole fish: migrant labour may be required to staff these new facilities.

Temperatures

Greenlanders can now buy home-grown potatoes and salad in Nuuk supermarkets but many southern farmers have fought with drought in 2015 and 2016. Grass growth is stunted, sheep are smaller, and farmers are forced to buy winter food rather than use their own fodder. The number of sheep farmers has fallen from 74 in 1983 to about 37 today.

Self-sufficiency in food may be a long way off but 70% of Greenlands energy is now renewable hydropower from melt-fed rivers. Hammond speaks of 100% renewable energy, and attracting energy-hungry server farms, which companies such as Google and Facebook typically situate inside the Arctic Circle. She also predicts a growth in tourism with ships entering newly ice-free fjords. Greenland is becoming a new tourist frontier, she said.

But the vision of a climate-changed Greenland as a tourist-friendly wilderness is challenged by the rapid industrialisation that will occur if Greenland becomes a big mining nation.

Greenlands move towards freedom in 2009 crucially included ownership of its own mineral reserves. Numerous exploratory licences have been issued to multinational mining companies. According to the governments Ministry of Mining Resources, Greenlands first mines a feldspar minerals mine and a ruby and pink sapphire mine are expected to go into production in 2017. Other mining projects include a zinc mine and a rare earth parts mine, drilling for gold in Nuuk fjord, and promising exploratory drilling for a nickel-copper-cobalt mine.

If or when the mining boom takes off, Greenlands indigenous population is likely to be dwarfed by migrant labour. Small countries suddenly enriched by mining often experience corruption or social problems but Hammond insists Greenland has prepared strong laws governing labour rights and mining royalties. The country has established a fund modelled on Norways oil-derived sovereign wealth fund.

Greenlands
Greenlands prime minister, Kim Kielsen, with an oil-bearing stone from Nuuk. Photograph: Alister Doyle/ Reuters

Greenlands parliament has adopted a mineral money but it doesnt mean well be going round with a million dollars in each pocket, said Hammond. It will not be used in the short-term but will ensure that Greenland is set up for bad days and used with good sense and with a unanimous vote in the parliament.

Sren Hald Mller, permanent secretary for Greenlands prime minister, Kim Kielsen, said the government viewed climate change as a concern, shortening the winter ice season in the north and stopping winter hunting and fishing.

We know that climate change also creates new opportunities, for example in new pelagic[ cod, herring, mackerel] fisheries. But still , no one can simply leap from one occupation to another that is completely different, Mller tells. My hope is that we as a society can adapt in the best possible route to the climatic changes, simply because we as a nation and as a people cannot prevent it.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

Climate change could attain cities 8C hotter- scientists

Combination of carbon emissions and urban hot island effect of concrete and asphalt gives rise to worst-case scenario by objective of 21 st century

Under a dual onslaught of global warming and localised urban heating, some of the worlds cities may be as much as 8C( 14.4 F) warmer by 2100, researchers have warned.

Such a temperature spike would have dire outcomes for the health of city-dwellers, rob companies and industries of able employees, and put pressure on already strained natural resources such as water.

The projection is based on the worst-case scenario assumption that emissions of greenhouse gases continue to rise throughout the 21 st century.

The top one-quarter of most populated cities, in this scenario, could see temperatures rise 7C or more by centurys end, told a study in the publication Nature Climate Change.

For some virtually 5C of the total would be attributed to average global warming.

The rest would be due to the so-called urban heat island effect, which occurs when parks, dams and ponds, which have a cooling consequence, is hereby replaced by concrete and asphalt stimulating cities warmer than their surrounds, the researchers said.

The top 5%[ of cities by population] could see increases in temperatures of about 8C and larger, survey co-author Francisco Estrada of the Institute for Environmental Study in the Netherlands said.

Estrada and a team utilized different projections of average planetary warming, combined with the UHI effect and potential damages, to estimate the future costs of warming on cities.

The median city, right in the midst of the range, stands to lose between 1.4% and 1.7% of GDP per year by 2050 and between 2.3% and 5.6% by 2100, they conclude.

For the worst-off city, loss could reach up to 10.9% of GDP by 2100, wrote the team.

UHI significantly increased city temperatures and economic losses from global warming, they added.

This meant that local actions to reduce UHI such as planting more trees or cooling roofs and pavements could make a big difference in limiting warming and minimising costs.

Cities cover merely about 1% of earths surface but render about 80% of gross world product and account for around 78% of energy consumed worldwide, say the researchers.

They render more than 60% of global carbon dioxide emissions from burning coal, oil and gas for fuel.

The worlds nations agreed in Paris in 2015 to the goal of restriction median global warming to two degrees centigrade over pre-industrial revolution levels by curbing greenhouse gas levels in the Earths atmosphere.

For the latest study researchers use data from the worlds 1,692 largest cities for the period 1950 to 2015.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

How to have a zero waste kitchen: tips-off from Jamie Oliver, Tom Kerridge, Skye Gyngell and more

Restaurants have a daily combat against wasting food. We asked top chefs for their home hackers that will save you money and give your cooking a flavour boost

According to the campaigning garbage charity Wrap, UK households bin 5m tonnes of edible food every year. That is 1.1 m tonnes less than in 2007, a drop-off that, in CO 2 terms, to equal taking 2.2 m autoes off the road per year. But, clearly, there is still a lot that could be done to inspire us to use the ingredients we buy with greater diligence.

Tom Tanner, a spokesperson for the Sustainable Restaurant Association( SRA ), tells:” It’s all very well telling people that the average UK household hurls out PS700 of food each year, but it can be tough playing Ready Steady Cook at home .” The SRA is attempting to help with its new One Planet Plate recipe site, a global inventory of sustainability-focused eatery dishes complete with recipes.

But faced with a fridge full of turning veg, the wreckage of a Sunday roast or pans of leftover rice, there is no such thing as too much inspiration. In that spirit, we asked a range of cooks who grapple with this issue daily to give us their waste-saving tips-off. Some are eco-conscious practitioners of nose-to-tail and root-to-fruit cooking( Silo in Brighton is Britain’s first “zero-waste” restaurant ), while others are simply trying to keep costs down. Here are their household hacks, aimed at saving you a few quid and giving your cooking a flavor boost. Who said that saving countries around the world can’t be a win-win?

Skye Gyngell, Spring, London

Fruit
Fruit and vegetable peels should not be disposed.


We keep all vegetable peelings. Almost the best flavour is to be found in carrot, beetroot or celeriac scalps. We make a simple puree employing potato peels cooked in salted water with herb stalks, then pureed with butter, pepper and buttermilk. To turn that into soup, omit the butter and thin using stock. We also make a peel coleslaw- at this time of year, from asparagus, young carrots, leek tops, beetroot and radish foliages- which you can dress with creme fraiche. Stir in honey, salt and any soft herbs for a nice summer accompaniment to roast chicken.

Jamie Oliver, cook and campaigner

Stale
Stale bread can be used to stimulate croutons.

Bread should never be wasted. If you look at great cooking from around the world, bread is often used stale and transformed into all sorts of tasty things, such as the classic Italian tomato and bread soup, pappa al pomodoro, or panzanella( tomato and bread salad ). Turn already-stale bread into croutons or, if you know you won’t finish your loaf before it turns, thinly slice it and leave to go stale for perfectly crisp toast- it is a fantastic vehicle for tapenade or bruschetta toppings. And you can always blitz stale bread into breadcrumbs for crispy coatings on fishcakes or to toast and scatter over pasta dishes. Delicious.

Ryan Blackburn, the Old Stamp House, Ambleside

A
A chicken can provide ingredients for several snacks.

Take the breasts off a chicken, use the leg meat in a curry and, for a third meal, roast the wings and carcass to make a lovely bone broth. Add madeira wine and roasted vegetables, top it up with water and cook gently with fresh herbs and salt. Don’t boil it; it will go cloudy. It surprises people that this clear liquid delivers so much flavour.

Hong Sui Li, Moshi Moshi, London

Don’t
Don’t dispose prawn heads after you have eaten the tail meat …

Once we’ve simmered tiger prawns to turn the tails into nigiri sushi, we’re left with a mass of prawn heads. At home[ in Hong Kong] we’re used to eating the brains. Prawn heads are quite like brown crab meat, so we took to dusting them in potato starch and deep-frying them. Eat them hot with a dipping sauce. We use chilli mayonnaise.

Mary Ellen-McTague, the Creameries and Real Junk Food, Manchester

Many
Many foods can be pickled to preserve them.

You can pickle pretty much anything with a 3:2: 1 mixture of vinegar-water-sugar. If it can’t be pickled, it can usually be frozen. In the restaurant, we sweat vegetables in fat, puree and freeze them. That’s a good soup base. You can freeze herbs or salad leaves and mix them with petroleum to make sauces and pestos. I use the freezer loads at home. Label everything, though. It’s really important. A permanent marker pen is essential kit.

Rachel Stockley, Baratxuri, Ramsbottom

Don’t discard meat fat after cooking. As small children, I’d eat my Filipino mum’s veggies cooked in pork fat. In a Spanish kitchen, we use traditional recipes that emphasise the need of fat for flavor. We’ve use rendered iberico fat to cook eggs, to flavour garlic soup and whipped like aioli to accompany fish. You can store most fats in jars in the refrigerator and they will be more effective than constantly employing that posh olive oil that you should only used only for garmenting , not frying.

Tom Kerridge, the Hand& Flowers and the Coach, Marlow

Shop little and often. When I used to shop for the week, I’d end up with everything in the fridge going off, especially quick perishables such as salad foliages, tomatoes, cucumber and mushrooms, or going out of date before I got around to cooking it.

Gouranga Bera, Curry Leaf Cafe, Brighton

Why not use the leftover veggies from your Sunday roast to attain pakoras? Any vegetable you have is fine. Thinly slice, add chopped onion, ginger, garlic, whatever spices you like and chickpea flour( about one-fifth of the total ), attain into balls in your hand, then deep-fry until crispy.

Tim Bouget, ODE& Co and ODE cafes, Devon

The best way to reduce household waste is putting less on your plate. You can always go back for more. As for leftovers, dried fruit scalps blitzed into a powder add an intensive orange or lemon zest to cakes.

Nicholas Balfe, Salon, London

Try
Try to buy a cauliflower with its foliages and stem intact.

Rather than a supermarket cauliflower that has been stripped of all its leaves and wrapped in cellophane, I’d encourage people to get one that has still got its beautiful green plumage. Don’t be afraid of using everything. It’s a versatile vegetable. We saute the florets, stir-fry the leaves or toss them in turmeric and ras-al-hanout and griddle them, and make a puree from the caramelised stalks.

Paul Collins, Yeo Valley Canteen, near Bristol

When we have a roast on, any’ left yeo vers ‘, as we call them, go into the following day’s beef and potato cakes, shallow-fried with a poached egg and hollandaise. That would work a treat at home too.

Richard Corrigan, Bentley’s Oyster Bar& Grill and Corrigan’s Mayfair, London

It’s better to run out of things than have food left over. Plan what you are going to eat each week, main meal, breakfast, at work. Write it down and buy accordingly. Talk to your butcher: how many grams of meat do you need per head? Instead of a leg[ of lamb ], get him to bone, roll and stuff a shoulder. It’s half the price. I think we should approach waste differently. Try not to have any.

Josh Overington, Le Cochon Aveugle and Cave du Cochon, York

Make
Make sauerkraut from cabbage leaves that would normally be thrown out.

I don’t geek out over fermenting but where, domestically, most people throw outer cabbage leaves away, I build sauerkraut. It’s great with confit duck or sausages. Roll the foliages into cylinders, cut them into strips and- utilizing a non-reactive container; a glass bowl is perfect- mixture the shredded leaves with salt[ 100 g per cabbage ]. Weigh down the cabbage to keep it submerged in the liquid it will release. Encompass the container with cheesecloth, leave it in a cool place for a week, then refrigerate it for a further two and it’s ready. Easy as that. It will maintain for six months.

Saiphin Moore, Rosa’s Thai and Lao Cafe, London

Day-old cooked rice is the best for fried rice, so if you’re cook jasmine rice, store any you don’t finish in an air-tight container and refrigerate it right away[ it is recommended you eat cooked rice within 24 hours ]. Keep it in the refrigerator and cook it from cold so it doesn’t run clumpy when stir-frying it. I add eggs, springtime greens, cherry tomatoes, dark and light soy sauce. With cooked sticky rice, roll it into balls and deep-fry it so it’s crunchy outside. It’s perfect in the spicy fermented sausage salad, yum nham khao tod.

Scott Smith, Fhior, Edinburgh

Read more: www.theguardian.com

White House proposes slashing funds to clean up toxic sites despite EPA’s pleas

EPA plan to focus on hazardous areas that pollute air and water, often near low-income communities and minorities, was dashed by presidents budget proposal

Environmental Protection Agency head Scott Pruitts vow to shift the agency back towards the vital work of dealing with toxic sites that pollute air and water has been dashed by a White House budget plan that would slash funding for the clean-ups.

Donald Trumps 2018 budget plan proposes severe cuts to clean-up programs targeting some of the most toxic sites in the US, which are invariably situated near low-income communities and minorities, despite a push by the EPA to prioritize these hazardous areas.

This month, Pruitt issued a directive that instructed the agency to quicken its response to polluted areas known as Superfund sites, where industrial activity or toxic accidents have tainted the air, water or soils.

In an internal memo, Pruitt said he will take oversight of Superfund remedial efforts, promising that the clean-ups will be restored to their rightful place at the center of the agencys core mission. There are more than 1,700 Superfund sites such as shuttered factories, quarries and landfills in the US, with a disproportionate number situated beside communities of color.

But Trumps budget proposal, set to be fully unveiled on Tuesday, would reduce funding for those clean-ups by nearly a third, while the budget for enforcing Superfund remedies with businesses would be slashed by almost 40%. The EPA budget documents were obtained and released by the National Association of Clean Air Agencies.

Furthermore, the EPAs environmental justice office, which champions the rights of communities burdened by pollution, would be closed down and the civil rights program would experience an 18% funding decrease.

Congress will have the responsibility for setting federal spending but Trumps budget request makes clear that the administration wants to pare down the EPA while increasing military spending and paying for a border wall with Mexico. Trump envisages cuts that would see the EPAs total budget shrink by nearly one third from $8.2bn to $5.65bn its lowest level, adjusting for inflation, in 40 years.

Trumps proposed budget eliminates several programs, with deep cuts to renewable energy and climate change-related initiatives. In March, Mick Mulvaney, the White House budget director, said climate research is a waste of your money. The 2018 plan would:

  • Reduce funding for the science and technology arm of the EPA by nearly 40% to $450m.
  • Cut grants to states for their own environmental protections from $3.6bn to 2.9bn.
  • Eliminate funding for the protection of major water ecosystems including the Chesapeake Bay, the Gulf of Mexico, the Puget Sound and the Great Lakes.
  • Remove all $19m in help for Alaskan native villages that are threatened by warming temperatures and sea level rise.
  • Reduce funding for drinking water health programs by $16m to $80m.
  • Scrap the $8m used to fund the greenhouse gas reporting program, which lists carbon emissions from industrial facilities.

However, it is unlikely that Trumps plan for the EPA will come to fruition, with some Republicans in Congress indicating that they believe the cuts go too far.

Charlie Dent, a Republican congressman who sits on the House appropriations committee, said: We want a functioning EPA and want their decisions to be based on best practices and science. I dont think anyone is here to kill the agency, were here to make it work better.

Catherine Lhamon, chair of the US Commission on Civil Rights, told the Guardian: If this budget is implemented, it will be at best a backward step and at worst extremely harmful to communities of color nationwide.

Last year, the commission released a report scathing of the EPAs extreme delays in responding to civil rights complaints in the area of environmental justice. It found that the agencys civil rights office had never made a formal finding of discrimination in its history.

The Obama administration created a new plan, called EJ2020, to address some of these problems but its future is now uncertain, with the EPA declining to comment on whether the strategy is to be scrapped.

An EPA spokeswoman said: We are still evaluating ways to comply with the presidents budget, and administrator Pruitt is committed to the idea that all programs need to work directly with communities who have been underserved by EPA.

Lhamon said: Civil rights and environmental justice are already seriously under resourced within the EPA. Cutting resources yet further will not help. Environmental justice concerns will exist even if the office doesnt and racial discrimination will persist even if the office of civil rights doesnt have the staff to address it.

Bill Becker, head of the National Association of Clean Air Agencies, said: In short, these cuts will result in more people dying prematurely and getting sick unnecessarily.

These cuts will mean delays in meeting health-based air quality standards, less inspections against noncomplying facilities, decreased monitoring in metropolitan areas, and fewer agency staff to address air quality problems.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

How to have a zero waste kitchen: tips-off from Jamie Oliver, Tom Kerridge, Skye Gyngell and more

Restaurants have a daily combat against wasting food. We asked top chefs for their home hackers that will save you money and give your cooking a flavour boost

According to the campaigning waste charity Wrap, UK households bin 5m tonnes of edible food every year. That is 1.1 m tonnes less than in 2007, a drop-off that, in CO 2 terms, is equivalent to taking 2.2 m cars off the road per year. But, clearly, there is still a lot that could be done to inspire us to use the ingredients we buy with greater diligence.

Tom Tanner, a spokesperson for the Sustainable Restaurant Association( SRA ), says:” It’s all very well telling people that the average UK household flings out PS700 of food per year, but it can be tough playing Ready Steady Cook at home .” The SRA is attempting to help with its new One Planet Plate recipe site, a global inventory of sustainability-focused eatery dishes complete with recipes.

But faced with a fridge full of turning veg, the wreckage of a Sunday roast or pans of leftover rice, there is no such thing as too much inspiration. In that spirit, we asked a range of cooks who grapple with this issue daily to give us their waste-saving tips-off. Some are eco-conscious practitioners of nose-to-tail and root-to-fruit cooking( Silo in Brighton is Britain’s first “zero-waste” restaurant ), while others are simply trying to keep expenses down. Here are their household hackers, is targeted at saving you a few quid and giving your cooking a flavour boost. Who said that saving countries around the world can’t be a win-win?

Skye Gyngell, Spring, London

Fruit
Fruit and vegetable peelings should not be disposed.


We maintain all vegetable peels. Almost the best flavour is to be found in carrot, beetroot or celeriac skins. We make a simple puree use potato peels cooked in salted water with herb stubbles, then pureed with butter, pepper and buttermilk. To turn that into soup, omit the butter and thin using stock. We also make a peel coleslaw- at this time of year, from asparagus, young carrots, leek tops, beetroot and radish leaves- which you can dress with creme fraiche. Stir in honey, salt and any soft herbs for a nice summer accompaniment to roast chicken.

Jamie Oliver, cook and campaigner

Stale
Stale bread can be used to construct croutons.

Bread should never be wasted. If you look at great cooking from around the world, bread is often used stale and transformed into all sorts of tasty things, such as the classic Italian tomato and bread soup, pappa al pomodoro, or panzanella( tomato and bread salad ). Turn already-stale bread into croutons or, if you know you won’t finish your loaf before it turns, thinly slice it and leave to go stale for perfectly crisp toast- it is a fantastic vehicle for tapenade or bruschetta toppings. And you can always blitz stale bread into breadcrumbs for crispy coatings on fishcakes or to toast and scatter over pasta dishes. Delicious.

Ryan Blackburn, the Old Stamp House, Ambleside

A
A chicken can provide ingredients for several dinners.

Take the breasts off a chicken, use the leg meat in a curry and, for a third dinner, roast the wings and carcass to make a lovely bone broth. Add madeira wine and roasted veggies, top it up with water and cook gently with fresh herbs and salt. Don’t boil it; it will go cloudy. It astonishes people that this clear liquid delivers so much flavour.

Hong Sui Li, Moshi Moshi, London

Don’t
Don’t discard prawn heads after you have eaten the tail meat …

Once we’ve simmered tiger prawns to turn the tails into nigiri sushi, we’re left with a mass of prawn heads. At home[ in Hong Kong] we’re used to eating the brains. Prawn heads are quite like brown crab meat, so we took to dusting them in potato starch and deep-frying them. Eat them hot with a dip sauce. We use chilli mayonnaise.

Mary Ellen-McTague, the Creameries and Real Junk Food, Manchester

Many
Many foods can be pickled to preserve them.

You can pickle pretty much anything with a 3:2: 1 mix of vinegar-water-sugar. If it can’t be pickled, it can usually be frozen. In the restaurant, we sweat veggies in fat, puree and freeze them. That’s a good soup base. You can freeze herbs or salad foliages and mix them with petroleum to attain sauces and pestos. I use the freezer loads at home. Label everything, though. It’s really important. A permanent marker pen is essential kit.

Rachel Stockley, Baratxuri, Ramsbottom

Don’t discard meat fat after cooking. As small children, I’d eat my Filipino mum’s veggies cooked in pork fat. In a Spanish kitchen, we use traditional recipes that emphasise the need of fat for flavor. We’ve use rendered iberico fat to cook eggs, to flavour garlic soup and whipped like aioli to accompany fish. You can store most fats in jars in the fridge and they will be more effective than constantly employing that posh olive oil that you should only used only for dressing , not frying.

Tom Kerridge, the Hand& Flowers and the Coach, Marlow

Shop little and often. When I used to shop for the week, I’d end up with everything in the fridge going off, especially quick perishables such as salad foliages, tomatoes, cucumber and mushrooms, or going out of date before I got around to cooking it.

Gouranga Bera, Curry Leaf Cafe, Brighton

Why not use the leftover vegetables from your Sunday roast to attain pakoras? Any vegetable you have is fine. Thinly slice, add chopped onion, ginger, garlic, whatever spices you like and chickpea flour( about one-fifth of the total ), construct into balls in your hand, then deep-fry until crispy.

Tim Bouget, ODE& Co and ODE cafes, Devon

The best way to reduce household waste is putting less on your plate. You can always go back for more. As for leftovers, dried fruit skins blitzed into a powder add an intense orange or lemon zest to cakes.

Nicholas Balfe, Salon, London

Try
Try to buy a cauliflower with its leaves and stem intact.

Rather than a supermarket cauliflower that has been stripped of all its foliages and wrapped in cellophane, I’d encourage people to get one that has as yet got its beautiful green plumage. Don’t be afraid of using everything. It’s a versatile vegetable. We saute the florets, stir-fry the foliages or toss them in turmeric and ras-al-hanout and griddle them, and make a puree from the caramelised stalks.

Paul Collins, Yeo Valley Canteen, near Bristol

When we have a roast on, any’ left yeo vers ‘, as we call them, go into the following day’s beef and potato cakes, shallow-fried with a poached egg and hollandaise. That would work a treat at home too.

Richard Corrigan, Bentley’s Oyster Bar& Grill and Corrigan’s Mayfair, London

It’s better to run out of things than have food left over. Plan what you are going to eat every week, main meal, breakfast, at work. Write it down and buy accordingly. Talk to your butcher: how many grams of meat do you need per head? Instead of a leg[ of lamb ], get him to bone, roll and stuff a shoulder. It’s half the cost. I think we should approach garbage differently. Try not to have any.

Josh Overington, Le Cochon Aveugle and Cave du Cochon, York

Make
Make sauerkraut from cabbage leaves that would normally be thrown out.

I don’t geek out over fermenting but where, domestically, most people throw outer cabbage leaves away, I construct sauerkraut. It’s great with confit duck or sausages. Roll the leaves into cylinders, cut them into strips and- use a non-reactive receptacle; a glass bowl is perfect- mixture the shredded leaves with salt[ 100 g per cabbage ]. Weigh down the cabbage to keep it submerged in the liquid it will release. Encompass the receptacle with cheesecloth, leave it in a cool place for a week, then refrigerate it for another two and it’s ready. Easy as that. It will maintain for six months.

Saiphin Moore, Rosa’s Thai and Lao Cafe, London

Day-old cooked rice is the best for fried rice, so if you’re cook jasmine rice, store any you don’t finish in an air-tight receptacle and refrigerate it right away[ it is recommended you eat cooked rice within 24 hours ]. Keep it in the refrigerator and cook it from cold so it doesn’t run clumpy when stir-frying it. I add eggs, spring greens, cherry tomatoes, darknes and light soy sauce. With cooked sticky rice, roll it into balls and deep-fry it so it’s crunchy outside. It’s perfect in the spicy fermented sausage salad, yum nham khao tod.

Scott Smith, Fhior, Edinburgh

Read more: www.theguardian.com

M& S drops cauliflower ‘steak’ amid ridicule from customers

Costing double the price of a whole vegetable and shrouded in layers of plastic, clean feeing product fails to make the cut

Marks& Spencer has withdrawn its” cauliflower steak” product from sale after it was ridiculed by customers for its “excessive” plastic packaging and inflated price.

The sliced cauliflower, which comes in plastic packaging with a separate sachet of lemon and herb drizzle, was being sold for twice the price of a whole, single cauliflower at the supermarket chain.

The product had come under fire on social media, with critics describing it as “wasteful” and “ridiculous” and complaining about the volume of packaging used as well as the inflated price. Whole, untrimmed cauliflowers are sold at M& S for PS1- typically for even less at other supermarkets- while the single-slice “steak” version cost shoppers PS2.

Confirming its decision to stop selling the item, a spokesperson for M& S said:” Once we’ve sold the stock that is currently in stores, we won’t be ordering any more of this product. We work hard to create rapid and convenient dinners for customers; however, on this occasion we didn’t get it right. We have launched many other vegetarian dishes that are already demonstrating popular with customers .”

The product was part of the store’s new “Veggie” scope, and was first spotted on Twitter by Rachel Clarke @rachclarke27, who triggered a lengthy thread after tweeting:

Another( Kathryn @ katie2 779) said:” People who buy this must have more fund than sense! What a wasteful item. The quantity of plastic and processing involved in this is ridiculous. Like you say, buy a cauliflower, rinse it and cut( and use all of it ).”

Rival Sainsbury’s also sells a similar product– a pack of two” cauliflower steaks in a herb and spice marinade” for PS1. 80, which is still on its shelves.
Trewin Restorick, chief executive of environmental charity Hubbub, said:” The public is increasingly concerned about the impact plastic packaging has on the environment, and social media gives them a chance to voice their concerns directly to companies. The too packaged, too priced cauliflower steak shows what happens when companies don’t get things right and hopefully it will lead to more environmentally sensible solutions in the future .”

With so-called ” Veganuary” under way and shoppers opting to reduce or cut out meat consumption in favour of ” clean feeing “ selections, supermarkets have been pulling out the stops to offer clients a range of ready-prepared spiralised vegetables- and even “mince” made of pulverised mushrooms and cauliflower and beetroot “rice”- to help them get back into shape after the festive season blowout. But this year has assured a backlash from shoppers complaining on social media about excessive packaging.

The U-turn from M& S arrives as the governmental forces prepares to announce a crackdown on excessive packaging and plastics on Thursday. A Defra spokesperson told:” Everyone has a role to play in tackling the scourge of plastics trash, and industries need to make sure their packaging does not exceed what is required to make sure that the products are safe, hygienic and acceptable for both the product and for the consumer.”

Read more: www.theguardian.com

Trump: 100 days that shook the world- and the activists fighting back

Three months in, the future is totally unpredictable. But a dramatic fightback is currently underway. Four activists tell us how they are adapting to the new normal

Naomi Wolf, writer, political journalist and cofounder of DailyClout: Trump didnt do this. You did this. Your own inaction brought us exactly here

The first 100 days of President Donald Trump: how has my life changed? First of all, there was the mourning period. Not for me, but for my fellow citizens. I was just mad. And I wasnt even maddest at the Trump voters. I understood that the critical battle lines now are not left versus right, but the 1% neoliberal globalisers attaining off with all of the loot and disembowelling the middle class. So when I find the campaign, I knew that in the US, just as in the UK, a candidate who said anything at all about people forgotten in the neoliberal race would have a solid chance.

No I was mad at my own leftwing tribe. All of January, people on the left would confront me with dazed, grief-stricken expressions, as if they had just emerged from a multi-car pileup on a foggy road. How could this have happened? What will we do ? I couldnt even bear to participate in those dialogues. Finally I started explaining my fury to my closest friends.

I had been screaming about the possibility of this very moment for eight years, since I publish a piece in the Guardian titled Fascist America in ten Easy Steps and wrote a volume based on it, called The Aim of America ( 2007 ). Under George Bush Jr, the left had been very receptive to the books message about how republics are undermined by the classic tactics of would-be authoritarians.

But once Obama was elected one of ours I had to expend the next eight years yelling like a haunted Cassandra, to a room the left had abandoned. I had hollered myself hoarse for eight years under Obama about what it would mean for us to sit still while Obama sent dronings in to take out US citizens in extrajudicial killings; what it would mean for us to sit still while he passed the 2012 National Defence Authorisation Act that let any president hold citizens for ever without charge or trial; what it would mean for us to sit still while he allowed NSA surveillance, permitted Guantnamo to stay open, and allowed hyped terrorism tales to hijack the constitution and turn the US into what ultimately even Robert F Kennedy Jr was calling a national security surveillance country.

Naomi
Naomi Wolf, photographed last week at Stony Brook University, NY: I was mad at my own leftwing tribe. Photograph: Christopher Lane for the Observer

For eight years, under Obama, my audiences were libertarian cowboys and red-state truckers; members of the military and police forces, who were appalled by what they were witnessing; and even conservatives, worried about our legacy of freedom. My usual audience, the shoppers at Whole Foods and drivers of hybrid vehicles, the educated left, my people, sat smugly at home while the very pillars of American democracy were being systematically chipped away. They were watching Downton Abbey and tending their heirloom tomato patches on weekends in the Hudson Valley, because “everythings” OK; yeah, he may OK drone ten-strikes, but they cant be that bad, since he was one of ours a handsome, eloquent African American, a former community organiser in the Oval Office. Seduced by the image of a charming black man on Air force One who talked about change a white female in a pantsuit( though highly pay off Goldman Sachs) talking about that highest, hardest glass ceiling the left slumbered while US democracy was undone brick by brick by brick.

So my feeling, the first inaugural month of 2017, as the left sat shiva, was: now you are worried? Now you want action? Now that the separation of powers is a joke and the constitution has collapsed around your ears, you point a thumb at Trump and tell, Sudden Catastrophe?

He didnt do this. You did this.

Your own inaction and willingness to be seduced by two-bit identity politics labels, without actually doing the hard work of being patriots and defending the actual constitution brought us precisely, exactly here.

I had sought for eight years to explain to my own people, to no avail, this: it is not that important who sits in the White House if the structures of democracy are strong. If the structures of democracy are strong you can have a madman or madwoman for four years or even eight, and then he or she is gone, and the nations freedoms live.

But if you take an eight-year nap snoozing through a systematic dismantling of the structures of democracy liberties of speech; independence of the press; separation of powers; fourth amendment rights to privacy; and allow the suspension of due process for the purposes of the guise of fighting the war on terror hell yeah, some day you will wake up and there will be a crazy human or a strongman in the White House and then nothing you do or tell will make a difference any more.

So yeah, Month One: I had nightly glasses of red wine to dull my rage at my own feeble delusional kind, and avoided the collective liberal mourning conversation.

Month Two: February was the month of OMG! Or else, WTF! I was part of it too, as Pres Trumps new-to-us-all methods of explosion Twitter bombs, engaging in scary political theatre, committing daily acts of apparent, um, economic treason, and doing it all at a bewilderingly fast pace, demanded a learning curve from us all. It was a sense of chaos, destabilisation. OMG! He issued a travelling forbid. OMG! People are held en masse at Newark New York City taxi drivers are boycotting the airport because of the ban! OMG, Uber is profiting on picking up those rides! OMG , now we have to boycott Uber! WTF! He is rounding up immigrants! OMG he is separating families at the border! WTF did Kellyanne Conway just promote Ivanka Trumps attire line? Isnt that illegal? WTF! Are Chinese influence-mongers genuinely lining up at Mar-a-Lago to ingratiate themselves with the presidents son-in-law? WTF stripping the EPA of any budget to keep the air and water clean? OMG did he just say he doesnt believes in global warming? There was a creek of statelier edits from Congress, as the nations WTF? reaction evolved into: can he really do that? Ben Cardin, the Democratic senator for Maryland, proposed a Senate resolution that Pres Trump obey the emoluments clause of the constitution, which forbids bribery( Trump had refused to put his constrains in a blind trust ). States began to pass laws, such as those protection sanctuary cities, to fight back against measures that Trump was taking federally. My day-to-day life was spent at our tech company, DailyClout, training a group of young people to write about legislation, Congress and statehouses, and putting out news narratives, blogs and sentiment pieces following these developments. DailyClout is incubated in a cool space in Manhattan called Civic Hall, which is financed by Microsoft, Google and Omidyar Networks, where we are surrounded by others largely idealistic millennials who are also constructing exciting new tools for new kinds of civic engagement.

Month Three: in March, we all began to see a massive grassroots resistance. I personally dont like that term, because you use that term to fight a completed fascist takeover; it gives democracys foes too much power; right now we have a battered democracy on life subsistence that it was necessary to defending from anyone wishing to pull the plug.

March was the month that dozens of new entities devoted to mobilising citizen action emerged from the collective shock. There were so many forms of new organising and funding: online nominee training seminars to Knight Foundation grants for new tools to get public and municipal records to people. Existing civic tech sites such as PopVox and Countable were joined in March by a slew of new tools and sites put together by this powerful wave of activism. Our collective missions get boosted with jet fuel by the huge burst in ordinary citizens wanting and needing to take action. New platforms ranged from 5 Calls which came out of the experience of volunteers in the Clinton campaign and which sends you political action steps to take in five phone calls to DailyAction, a similar service, which emerged out of Creative Majority, a Pac that supports Democratic candidates, and USAFacts, put in by Steve Ballmer, formerly of Microsoft, which compiles and crunches federal, state and local data from government sources. My own life mission didnt reorient, since I had cofounded DailyClouts platform in 2010. But employ of our civic engagement tools skyrocketed. Our first product, called BillCam, lets you search a database of live country and federal bills, then pop a live bill into your blog or news articles; it lets you interact with the bills in real day and share them socially. We also made RSS feeds to stream live state and federal legislation right into the websites of local, regional and national news sites, and the websites of elected official. In March we boosted our blog stream and videos encompassing new country and federal legislation, and started to report on what people could do locally to push forward their issues. Our sites on social media was increased by triple and quadruple digits.

Protesters
Protesters against Trumps travel ban order outside JFK Airport, 30 January. Photo: Xinhua/ Barcroft Images

I presented these tools in March to news outlets and candidates and campaigns around the country from Maine to Ohio to Oregon. I felt as if I was rediscovering my own nation, as the person or persons in it were rediscovering belatedly how precious and fragile republic was, and how much it depends on an informed citizenship. We were invited to demo it in a senate office; we visited Congress too, for our first exclusive interview, with Representative French Hill of Arkansas; I had never before been inside the Senate office building, or the Congresss Longworth House Office Building. It was uplifting and moving to me. I also ensure that elected official worried about republic, and wanting to empower real citizens, existed on both sides of the aisle.

We get our widget embedding live bills into news outlets totalling 160 million readers. In Q1 of 2017, 113,000 people searched BillCam to look at bills that would affect them that they could now affect in turn. There are still shocking days missiles to Syria, gunboats to North Korea but we stay focused.

An amazing thing happened in March. The distinguished technologist George Polisner who quit his senior-level role at Oracle in a public letter, covered widely in the US press, in which he demurred from Oracles CEOs intention of working with President Trump had started Civ.Works, a social platform, privacy protected so citizens can organise without anxiety of a corporate-buyout Big Brother. Polisner and DailyClout joined forces in March. Were working to combine Civ.Works power of organising with the power of DailyClouts streaming digital updates via RSS feeds, blogs and video, about local and federal legislation. No wonder I feel excited about the future.

Am I happy about the present? I feel unbelievably energised, hopeful and certain that if enough citizens, in our democracy and worldwide, wake up( because this is) and are able to get hold of real tools to use republic and those best-case tools are now digital and link to social and digital media we can indeed be in the midst of what another president called a new birth of liberty. Where I live, every day, on the frontlines of this digital revolution, there is every reason to feel in spired. That doesnt entail I am happy about where the nation is I am extremely scared, just as I am frightened about the future of Europe in a parallel assault on its democracies.

But the biggest threat in the US or the UK isnt one political party or candidate. It is peoples ignorance about their own republics and their till-now lack of real-life tools protecting children. DailyClout UK and DailyClout EU are next on our list of planned launches: the UK legislative database is altogether unsearchable, and the UK Parliaments own website ends in dead connections when you try to find actual legislation. The EU website tells you with difficulty what bills have passed but doesnt indicate you what is coming up, when you might possibly take action it offers a feed of pointless press releases instead. This lack of legislative transparency and usability had a lot to do, I believe, with the Brexit vote.

Months Four, Five and Six will see more and more of these tools from dozens of T-shirt-clad bespectacled tech revolutionaries, coming online. Geeks are the new patriots, and code is the new shoot hear round the world.

Naomi Wolf recently finished a PhD at the University of Oxford and is CEO of DailyClout.io

May Boeve, environmental campaigner and director of 350. org: We will take power back. And when that happens, we need a very bold agenda

May
May Boeve photographed in Dumbo Brooklyn: Were up against: the full political might of the fossil-fuel industry. Photograph: Christopher Lane for the Observer

As soon as we sang the first chorus of the hymn, the tears started. Here I go again, I guessed, exclaiming in church. This was three weeks ago. And the week before, and the week before that, all the route back to last Novembers election.

Sudden emotional outbursts are how Im able to understand what Donald Trumps presidency means to me. I wasnt disconnected to these emotions before, but its the unexpected and potent nature that has changed.

Im in no immediate peril from the Trump presidency. Im not dreading expulsion, the loss of my healthcare, a racially motivated arrest. I havent been personally attacked online or in the real world. So when I get scared and start crying, I wonder what it would feel like to be in that more vulnerable position, and Im more distressed by the damage being done.

My lens on Trump stems from work in the climate motion. My vantage point is as executive director of 350. org, a global effort to build a social movement that they are able confront the power of the fossil-fuel industry and accelerate our transition to 100% renewable energy.

Trump stands in direct opposition to those goals. As chairman, he has wholeheartedly taken the side of the petroleum, coal, and gas industry and is already watching to it that their agenda is enacted. Previous US presidents and nominees also did business with this industry, but at the same hour they denounced the threat of climate destabilisation, worked actively to secure international diplomatic confederations leading to an agreement, and achieved some progression from the executive branch.

Before Trumps election, the climate movement had made some serious advance. Thanks to the good work of movements around the world, the social licence of this industry is on the deterioration. Investors are pulling their dollars, banks are cancelling loans, and public support for fossil-fuel companies is low.

Ditto for the politicians who back them up. Take congressman Lamar Smith of Texas : 45% of his constituents , not unacquainted with his ties to the oil industry, were less inclined to vote for Smith when as chair of the house science committee he failed to investigate ExxonMobils alleged climate cover-up.( 350. org is under subpoena from Smiths office for our efforts to get the truth out about Exxon .) From the political arena to our energy markets, it felt like the tide was ultimately beginning to turn in our direction.

But then along arrived Donald Trump to proclaim climate change a hoax( the only head of state in the world to do so ), promising to revive the coal industry( declining in the US, thanks to terrific organising ), and appointing known climate-change deniers to head the very offices responsible for regulating the problem.

When Trump won, a new various kinds of despair determined over climate activists. Were pretty accustomed to despair already climate sorrow circles have started up in Australia, home to devastating heatwaves, fires, drought, and a basically decimated Great Barrier Reef but this felt like something new.

One week after the election, I was at a gathering with motion leaders across the faith, labour, LGBTQ and reproductive justice motions. We were each asked to write down one hard truth about the election that we hadnt yet told out loud. One person wrote: The small window of time we had to dramatically reduce emissions may have just closed.

At the very day when we need to be taking great leaps forward, Trump and his allies are dragging us backwards with an ideology that puts corporate power above all else and youd be hard pressed to find a define of corporations more desperate to hold on to power than the likes of Exxon, Chevron and numerous coal and gas companies with less brand recognition.

At least now theres no mystery about what were up against: the full political might of the fossil-fuel industry. Two instances register highly on that rating. The first is the appointment of former ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson as secretary of state. The second is the construction of the Dakota Access pipeline.

The
A successful protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline slated to drill beneath the Missouri River and through sacred Sioux grounds has been reversed by Trump Photograph: DDP USA/ Rex/ Shutterstock

The Tillerson appointment stands out because even the most cynical and pessimistic among us didnt predict that a person at the pinnacle of big oil would be in charge of diplomacy in the Trump regime. As my colleague Bill McKibben has said, you might as well ask Ronald McDonald to head up the Department of Agriculture. And Exxon isnt merely any petroleum company: it has concealed what it knew about climate change, as early as the late 1970 s, in order to continue making money on a product it knew was wrecking countries around the world. It funded climate-denying thinktanks and retained the same firms that helped tobacco companies claim that nicotine isnt addictive. It should be bad enough to have the entire cabinet made up of the 1 %, but the nation post provides Tillerson and Exxon with too much temptation to officially use the US foreign policy apparatus to keep extracting more oil.

The night I assured that Trump suggested Tillerson for the post, I burst into tears and crawled into bed. It was a feeling close to panic, in recognition of what might happen and how powerless I felt. Thank goodness Im part of a big team, some of whom love combat and were quick to start writing and producing statements denouncing his appointment. Reports “re coming out” last week that of all the cabinet members, Tillerson is doing the best task keeping a close relationship to the president. Because this human is used to is working in privacy, well have to stay vigilant to understand the moves hell be making.

Then there is the remarkable story about the Dakota Access pipeline and the historic resistance at Standing Rock. At no other day has there been this much widespread opposition to a gas pipeline, for the many reasons pipelines merit our opposition. This represented an alliance of tribes whose rights, subsistences and lives have been systematically desecrated by the US government and corporations. The camp at Standing Rock itself was a emblem of everything Trumpism cannot be: spiritually grounded, connected to history and land, fundamentally respectful for the human rights of nature and peoples, infused with art and music and heart. It moved people to act in solidarity all over the world. Many moved fund out of the banks invested in the project.

And the resistance ran. The forces at Standing Rock peacefully stimulated sure that the Obama administration put a stop to the construction and allowed further review of the pipelines viability.

So it was with cruelty the same cruelty seen in the enactment of the Muslim travel ban and the gamble with the healthcare of 24 million people that Trump signed an executive order to begin construction instantly. At the end of March, oil began to flow through the pipeline. This is why Im still screaming in church. The minute I start to feel numb, I believe Ill lose some hope and resolve.

And there is another animating aim. Progressives share so much, but so often our human nature and lopsided structures get in the way. Can we use this moment to be honest with one another in a new and different route, and clear up longstanding disagreements and inequalities that enable us to be aligned behind a common vision? Because I believe we will take power back. And when that happens, we need to enact a very bold agenda that propels political possibilities far, far away from where Trump has dragged them.

This work is already under way: its the work of conversations between unions and environmentalists; big, well-funded organisations and smaller grassroots ones; centrist and more radical activists; and those who believe change comes from disrupting unjust laws and those whose work is to pass only ones.

Its the work of the Peoples Climate March, which will take place on Saturday, 29 April in Washington DC and throughout the rest of the country. Its message aspires to the future were trying to build, and its being organised by a diverse cross-section of the entire movement.

That tearful day in church aimed on a high note. Afterwards, some friends and I went to New Yorks MoMA PS1 museum to see the Rev Osagyefo Uhuru Sekou perform. Rev Sekou is a Pentecostal minister, an author and a gospel and blues musician, who has been active in the Movement for Black Lives. Yes, I went to church twice that day, and no, that isnt the norm for me! And where reference is sing What a time to be alive, the revolution has come, I didnt feel like crying I felt like getting back to work.

Alicia Garza, co-founder, Black Lives Matter: We are in for a long battle and not all of us will make it

Alicia
Alicia Garza: The resistance is real. Photo: Kristin Little

20 January 2017 marked a turning point for the entire world. Since the outcome of the elections were announced on 8 November 2016 Id been feeling largely numb, unable to process what potential impacts would be for me, my family and the person or persons I care about. I felt the need to be quiet, to be somewhere quiet. To have space to think.

Every step I took felt like walking on eggshells. The first few weeks after the election everyone around me seemed to be unsure, fearful and riddled with anxiety. I was too. Quick to lash out, slacken to listen. I had nothing to start from except what Id heard during the campaign.

And yet, at the same time, I did know what was coming. Perhaps somewhere my cells were reorganising to protect my heart from what was inevitable. More suffering, more uncertainty. More people dying for trying to live. During the campaign, the surrogates for our current president unabashedly assaulted Black Lives Matter activists as terrorists and policeman murderers. In the aftermath of the election, there were many different answers. Some decided to continue their work as before and felt that not much had changed. Others decided to demonstrate their resistance by doing a direct action at the inauguration. Others shared information about the key players in the incoming administration, attempting to support others in the network to understand more clearly the new political agenda. All of us remain committed to the work of black liberation.

During the holidays, my family and I talked over dinner about personal security. I described to them a new situate of protocols we would need to begin using in order to ensure our safety, insofar as that was even possible. My mothers described their fear of what was to come. A lawsuit filed by a rabid conservative former district attorney hung over our heads as someone charged us and other activists with starting a race war. Indeed, the election of Donald Trump was like a nuclear plume slowly rising over the United States.

What Ive learned in the first 100 days of this administration is that you can never stop dreaming about liberty. Ive spent the past few months being relatively quiet. Listening. Brushing up on my reading about the right wing in the United States and the movement it has been diligently constructing for the past 30 years. Ive taken to a practice of listening more and also listening less. Listening more to whats not being said, watching as the various cliques on the right joust for power and influence. Ive taken stock of the damage, as the right wing now controls the presidency, the supreme court, Congress and the majority of state legislatures. Listening less to voices that refuse to deal with our political reality as it actually is, as opposed to how they want it to be.

The low phases over the past few months have been many. Executive order after executive order that sought to punish the communities that induce America great Muslims, undocumented immigrants, black people, women, fag communities, transgender people. A law and order agenda that seeks to criminalise anyone who disagrees with the administrations intents. An us attorney general who refuses to protect each person equally. A secretary of education who seeks to privatise public education. A secretary of housing and urban planning who seeks to slash an already paper-thin budget for housing set aside for those living in poverty. A chief strategist with white supremacist leaningswho is responsible not just for advising the president, but who, to all intents and purposes, is the one pushing the many decisions that this so-called chairwoman espouses on television. And of course, the recent bombings of Syria and Afghanistan. Surely, we are in for a long battle and not all of us will make it.

A
A Protest against proposed Republican legislation that would change Medicaid funding, New York. Photo: Justin Lane/ EPA

I comfort my mothers who are concerned about the state of their healthcare. Theyre both in their 60 s and have recently retired. And so, while the Affordable Care Act isnt perfect, it is what they have and it is what they depend on. And it is what they deserve, what every human being on this Earth deserves to be cared for.

And yet I am hopeful. The disorganisation of our political landscape offers abundant a chance for new strategies and a transformation in the way we care for each other. I welcome the opportunity to be closer to my neighbours, to fight for myself, my family and my loved ones with every fiber of my being. Inside of the quiet, the cynicism dissipates. We have no choice other than to fight back, to take back what was always flawed but still holds the promise of what could be.

I remember that the resistance is real and it lives. The day before the president is inaugurated, I join more than a million women in the streets of Washington, DC ; for many, this was their first time on a demo. When the president followed orders from his chief strategist to institute a travel ban on Muslims, airports were shut down by those fighting for republic and those caught in the crosshairs of such a ridiculous endeavour were given legal subsistence and reunited with their families. I work with the National Domestic Workers Alliance, a prominent voice and political vehicle for the millions of domestic workers in the United States who are still excluded from most federal labor protections and so when the president initially nominated a human for secretary of labour who was known for his opposition to workers rights, we participated in the resistance to stop him from being confirmed. Representatives returned to their home districts and were forced to face their constituents in ways that they havent had to in decades.

And so, while there are many challenges to overcome, it is good to know that we are not alone in attempting to find the solutions necessary to save our lives and the lives of millions who are vulnerable not just in the United States, but around the world. Wherever there is persecution, there is resistance. Im happy to know which side Im on.

Linda Tirado, writer on poverty: My instinct is to set off around the country asking impertinent questions

Linda
Linda Tirado photographed in Washington, DC: At least I have fertile land and a defensible perimeter. Photograph: Scott Suchman for the Observer

I live in the heart of Trump country, in Meigs County, Ohio, a rural county struggling with poverty and craving. My neighbours are precisely the people the right wing have been preying on and propagandising while the left abandoned them for decades. I wasnt awfully surprised to see Clinton had lost. Id just published a column in the Guardian about why so many people would be voting for Trump. But I sob on election night and then get well and truly drunk, because I didnt want to think about what was coming next.

My household is bracing of natural disasters. I wrote a volume, Hand to Mouth , about what a precarious life feels like, but this is the first time Ive felt precarity coming in my bones and also had enough income to assuage my anxieties of: not enough food , not sufficient warmth , not enough anything on hand to deal with an emergency. I have a garden, as anyone in the country does, but we got serious about it after the election. This is the first year Ive thought that food prices will spike enough to make it worth focusing on the garden as a food source , not just a hobby. Increased immigration raids will likely leave food decompose in the fields and shipping expenses will probably go up as they do during periods of uncertainty; imported food will be more expensive.

And the more the country “was talkin about a” Russia, the more sense it made to expand the plans we had for a few tomatoes and beans to include asparagus and maybe some root veggies because theyll keep just fine. The logic: oil and power costs tend to spike when Russias doing a thing and were bombing the Countries of the middle east. Then we guessed: maybe berry bushes. A few fruit trees. And a herb patch. And perhaps we should borrow a tiller at this phase or buy one? Merely now, Im mapping out two weeks of my schedule around harvest time so I can be home to do the food preservation. Were not about freeze-dried food storage yet; right now people are still only joking about nukes.

Besides, this part of the countrys turning into a rainforest. A decade ago this part of Ohio didnt reach such high temperatures. Now summers are lush and humid, while wintertimes are becoming harsher. So its not such a bad notion, if you happen to have the land and the time to get the work done, to be working on sustainability. Partially thats environmentalism, but its an economic consideration too. Its a thing we talk about over dinner at home or with friends. We also talk about power. Electricity is expensive, so is heating oil, and gas aint free either. Power will merely get more expensive as regulations are rolled back and the market is left to its own devices. Water is already a scarce commodity. Might as well put in some solar panel if you are able afford it.

I expended the weeks between the election and the inauguration largely glued to Twitter. I tried to help people reason through what had just happened. I impatiently explained the philosophical and historic definition of fascism versus the hyperbolic version. I demanded we all grow up and focus on the important stuff: not what had happened, but what was coming. My audience grew and split into groups people who liked my satirical round-ups of the incoming administrations peccadilloes, people who liked that I discussed the reasons we were vulnerable to a demagogue, people who just wanted someone to explain what the fuck is had happened.

I started taking more note of political dialogue I heard around me, too, here in rural Ohio, where they ran for Trump hard. Consensus seemed to be building that voting Trump hadnt worked but as it was a last-ditch attempt anyway, it was worth waiting to see. Nobody quite agreed on what he was supposed to have done or, rather, there were a lot of things. Largely, he was supposed to have interrupted everything but not exactly like this. He needed to get down that stupid Twitter, anyway, everyone agreed on that. I maintain wondering what these people didnt learn from the Tea Party.

Once the inauguration was over, I largely discontinue trying to explain anything to anyone online; feeling was riding too high and “were in” back to breaking news instead of analysis and I was planning a garden, so I started joking that no matter what happened, at the least I had fertile land and a defensible perimeter. When the children werent listening, we talked about what guns to buy.

Great Barrier Reef: scientists ask Malcolm Turnbull to curb fossil fuel use

International Society for Reef Studies chairmen say prime minister should prioritise reef after devastating damage

As the largest international gathering of coral reef experts comes to a close, scientists have written to the Australian “ministers “, Malcolm Turnbull, calling for action to save the worlds reefs.

The letter was sent to Turnbull on Saturday imploring his government to do more to conserve the nations reefs and curb fossil fuel consumption.

The letter, signed by past and present presidents of the International Society for Reef Studies on behalf of the 2,000 attendees of the International Coral Reef Symposium held in Honolulu the coming week, exhorted the Australian government to prioritise the Great Barrier Reef.

This year has find the worst mass bleaching in history, threatening many coral reefs around the world including the whole of the northern Great Barrier Reef, the biggest and best-known of all reefs, the letter told. The damage to this Australian icon has already been devastating. In addition to damage from greenhouse gasses, port dredging and shipping of fossil fuels across the Great Barrier Reef break Australias responsibilities for stewardship of the reef under the World Heritage Convention.

Leaders from the scientific community at the convention in Honolulu said on Friday the letter was critical to the conservation of the fragile reef habitat.

Scientists were not known for their political activism, said James Cook University professor Terry Hughes, but they felt this crisis warranted such action.

We are not ready to write the obituary for coral reef, told Hughes, who is also the president of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral reef Studies in Australia.

Messages attempting commentary from Turnbull on Saturday were not returned.

A call to action from three Pacific island nations whose reefs are suffering from the largest and longest-lasting coral bleaching event on record was presented on Friday at the conclusion of the symposium.

The heads of state from Palau, Micronesia and the Marshall Islands attended the conference and provided a plan to help save their ailing reefs, which are main contributor to their local economies and the daily sustenance of their people. The call to action, signed by the three chairpeople, asked for better collaboration between scientists and local governments.

If our coral reef are further degraded, then our reef-dependent communities will suffer and be displaced, the letter told. They also called for more integration of traditional knowledge, customary practices and scientific research in building a comprehensive coral reef policy.

In response conference participants pledged to work with the governments to curb the continued loss of reefs.

In the northern third of the Great Barrier Reef, close to half of the corals had died in the past three months, said Hughes, who focuses his research there. The area of the reef that suffered most was extremely remote, he told, with no pollution, very little angling pressure and no coastal development.

Thats an absolute tragedy, Hughes said. Theres nowhere to hide from climate change.

Last year, the United Nations expressed concern about the state of the Great Barrier Reef and recommended Australia to boost its conservation efforts.

The panel of scientists in Hawaii emphasised the progress they have induced over the past 30 years in helping improve the health status of coral reef and should be pointed out that good research and management programs for coral reefs were available. The scientists said they just needed the proper fund and political will to enact them.

The researchers focused on the economic and social benefits coral reefs contribute to communities across the globe, saying the critical habitats made trillions of dollars annually but preservation endeavours were not proportionately or adequately funded.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

Let’s make this a real’ leap’ year, and go fossil fuel-free | Naomi Klein

The Leap Manifesto is an unashamedly radical plan to convert the world to 100% renewable energy, fast. And you can be a part of it

Leap day is coming up at the end of the month remember this one?

Thirty days hath September,
April, June, and November.
All the remainder have thirty one,
except February, on its own,
which has twenty eight most times.
And in a leap year, twenty nine.

I get interested in leap years a few months ago when a group of us in Canada were trying to come up with a title for an independent political platform we had just drafted. The document launched during our recent federal election and signed by thousands and thousands of Canadians was a roadmap to get the country entirely off fossil fuel by the mid-century or sooner, in line with what many scientists are telling us we must do, and what technologists are telling us we now can do.

And we wanted to go further: the plan argues that in the process of fundamentally changing our country to make it green, we also have a once-in-a-century opportunity to make it fairer. We could redress terrible incorrects done to indigenous peoples; radically reduce economic, racial and gender inequalities; eliminate legal double the criteria for immigrant workers; and create a whole lot of stable, well-paying tasks. In very un-Canadian fashion, we even dared to hope that the manifesto might become a model for similar broad-based confederations in other countries.

The text we came up with was unabashedly radical, and it went on to be endorsed by more than 100 organisations. An array of Canadian celebrities also added their names: Leonard Cohen, Donald Sutherland and Ellen Page, among others.

Our first challenge was what to call it. We wanted to convey the necessity of achieving speed, since as Christiana Figueres, the executive secretary of the UN framework convention on climate change, said recently: Where capital goes in the next five years will decide what kind of world we have.

One suggestion was The Leap. And yes, we worried about inevitable comparings to Mao Zedongs disastrous Great Leap Forward. But what ultimately tip-off the balance in its favour was when we realised that 2016 is a leap year.

It wasnt just good timing, we supposed, but a powerful analogy. After all, we periodically add an extra day to our calendars because if we didnt, the seasons would gradually fall out of alignment and eventually the seasons would go wacky. Imaging New Yorkers doing their Christmas shopping in T-shirts( oh right, that happened ).

It was Julius Caesar, in 46 BC, who decided to bring the 365 -day solar calendar to the Romans, throwing in that extra day every four years. He wasnt known as a humble man, but even a dictator in perpetuity realised that it was easier to change regulations written by other humen than it is to change the laws of nature.

Thats a lesson worth re-learning and fast. Like the Romans with their failing calendar, we find ourselves trapped within multiple failing systems: economic, political, even spiritual. And all these system failings have put humanity on a collision course with countries around the world, which warms and writhes the more we refuse to recognise its limits.

UN

To much fanfare, our governments unveiled a global climate handled in Paris. Photograph: Francois Mori/ AP

We all received a vivid reminder of this problem a couple of months ago in Paris. To much fanfare, our governments unveiled a global climate bargain that pledged to keep warming levels to 2C or better yet, 1.5 C. Then many of those politicians went home to hand out new drilling rentals, new pipelines, and new highways.

Thats why we chose The Leap as the name for our manifesto: the gap between where we are and where we need to be is so great, and the time so short, that small steps simply will not cut it.

With this in mind, the manifesto not only calls for a rapid change to 100% renewable electricity, it insists that these new energy projects should be democratically controlled and that indigenous peoples should be first to receive public is supportive of their own clean energy projects. So should communities currently dealing with heavy health the health effects of polluting industrial activity.

To pay for all this, we called for dramatic changes to how public revenues are collected and spent, from an end to fossil fuel subsidies, and higher royalty rates on fossil fuel extraction, to cuts in military spending. And those are just a few of its 15 demands.

The plan captured the imagination of many Canadians. Burned out by decades of the struggle against what they dont want tar sands pipelines, explosion petroleum develops, draconian security bills they seized on the chance to rally around a vision for the world they actually wishes to. On leap day later this month, there will be sessions, teach-ins and other events across the country, all of them pushing our new government to adopt a holistic approach to the twin crisis of climate change and inequality.

And as we had hoped, it is spreading beyond our own borders. Platforms partly inspired by The Leap have been launched in Denmark and across the European Union, and others are in the works in England and Australia. Even one in Nunavut. Several groups in the US are looking at drafting regional leap manifestos.

Two millennia ago, Julius Caesar realised that there was something even more powerful than his empire: the planets revolution around the sunlight. Today, we need a different kind of solar revolution, one that doesnt only change how we generate our power, but also who benefits.

Heres the good news: we have the momentum to make that leap from the recent victories against Keystone XL and Shells Arctic drilling, to the surprising strength of Bernie Sanders presidential campaign.

So take a minute or two to be considered the extra day at the end of this month. Its a reminder that people can indeed are working together to change a failing decide of rules. The the statutes of nature , not so much.

Then lets make this 2016 the year we started to bridge the chasm between what is, and what must be. Lets make it the year we started to leap.

The Leap Manifesto, along with a listing of its original signatories, can be read in 10 languages here. To find out about leap year activities visit leapyear2 016. org. On Friday 5 February, Naomi Klein is co-hosting a leap year-themed Google hangout with Bill McKibben of 350. org, Asad Rehman of Friends of the Earth and others. Register here.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

The Dows Biggest Loser Last Year Was Its Biggest Winner This Week

After a disastrous 2017, General Electric Co. kicked off this year with the best start on the Dow Jones Industrial Average. The topic is whether the gains will last.

With no major developings specific to the company, the shares probably got a boost from investors foreseeing a rebound after last year’s selloff, told Deane Dray, an analyst with RBC Capital Markets. While that’s a welcome respite for long-suffering stockholders, GE still faces an arduous turnaround effort.

Standout Stock

After a poor 2017, GE was the top musician in the Dow during the first week of 2018

Note: Chart includes top and bottom 2018 YTD stocks on DJIA

” There is this reflexive dogs-of-the-Dow bias ,” Dray told.” There are still too many negatives and unknowns to give anyone the clear signs that the worst is behind them .”

GE is grappling with weakness in the markets for its power-generation and oilfield equipment, and Chief Executive Officer John Flannery is selling assets and cutting billions of dollars in costs. The manufacturer is also contending with a pension deficit and challenges from a long-term-care insurance portfolio.

But at least for the holiday-shortened first week of the year, GE dedicated off a faint glimmer of its former stock-market glory. Shares gained 6.2 percentage, their biggest weekly increase in more than a year. That followed last year’s 45 percent plunge, which wiped out $128 billion in shareholder value and was the worstdrop on the Dow.

GE is likely to rise 10 percent in the next 12 months, according to the average of analyst calculates compiled by Bloomberg. It should at least get a boost from broad economic health, said Nicholas Heymann, an analyst with William Blair& Co.

Demand Recovery

” The macro environment for the global industrial economy is shaping up in 2018 to perhaps be the best in so far this century ,” Heymann said in a report Thursday. Rising oil prices and strength in commercial aerospace are eligible to lift sentiment for GE this year after a” horrendous 2017 ,” he said.

” We sense forward expectations have been taken down to the level where they can be achieved in a’ sleep-walking’ surrounding ,” Heymann said. Still, the turnaround” will require an endless amount of heavy lifting .”

GE still needs to demonstrate its ability to reduce its pension deficit, improve cash flow and pull off asset sales, Heymann said. Dray pointed to pending reserve charges related to long-term-care insurance as its concern. GE has been studying the impact of that on the finance business and announced that dividends pay off GE Capital to the parent would be suspended as a result.

The Boston-based producer will announce its fourth-quarter earnings Jan. 24 and may provide additional details on expectations for the year.