There’s a search for a fifth meat- and 19 other things podcasts taught us in 2016

Whether its asking what happens when you watch Sex and the City 2 more than 50 times or which Oscar has won an Oscar, theres no question a podcast somewhere hasnt answered

1 Richard Ayoade employed a ThunderCats duvet cover until he was in his late 20 s

Where we learned it The Adam Buxton podcast

Adam Buxtons life-affirming, jingle-packed ramble chats with his celebrity guests are a constant delight. In this two-parter, the multi-talented Ayoade went into everything from the high levels of pillows to the reaction to his notoriously awkward interview with Krishnan Guru-Murthy. As funny as the pod is, you are able to learn a lot, too from Buxtons honest discussions of sorrow when his daddy died to how upsetting Sara Pascoe observes it when people attain clicky sticky noises with their mouths.

Other lessons from this podcast Louis Theroux does a fine rendition of Yes Sir, I Can Boogie. Ellie Violet Bramley

Malcolm
Journalist and writer Malcolm Gladwell. Photo: Anne Bailey

2 One of the biggest automobile recollects in history may have been caused by drivers pressing the incorrect pedal

Where we learned it Malcolm Gladwells Revisionist History

If you are familiar with Gladwells run, then Revisionist History is both a treat and familiar province. The New Yorker novelist often takes assumptions and things we might think to be true and unravels them to end up in a different place wholly. In his bestseller Blink, he explained why it might not have been so unusual that an unarmed man was shot 41 times by New York police. In the best episode of Revisionist History, Gladwell appeared back at Toyotas sudden unintended acceleration phenomenon, which led to a gigantic penalty for the car maker. The conclusion after we listen to a 911 call in which a man is driven to his death by a car that wont slow down was not that the cars accelerators were sticking, but that drivers unfamiliar with certain automobiles were having a brain malfunction that meant the latter are physically unable to differentiate between the brake and the accelerator.

Other lessons from this podcast American colleges with the nicest canteens are the worst selections for poor students; if you want to score the most free-throws in basketball, do them underarm. Will Dean

3 One day, everyone in Sweden switched to driving on the opposite side of the road

Where we learned it 99% Invisible

You neednt be an architecture or design fanatic to enjoy Roman Marss gentle unpicking of how the world around us came to look and function as it does. As well as narratives about the origins of the inflatable humen they have outside automobile traders in the US, and why they used to publicize missing children on milk cartons, you can learn about Hgertrafikomlggningen , or H-day 3 September 1967 when everyone in Sweden switched from driving on the left side of the road to the right.

Other lessons from this podcast Californias Salton Sea was formed by mistake; 20 years ago, the world became obsessed with a phone booth in the middle of the Mojave desert. Leah Harper

4 Having your own podcast wont win you an election

Where we learned it With Her

How do we know that Hillary Clinton enjoyed a Cuban sandwich and a beer at the end of a day on the road? Well, she had her own campaign podcast, about the little details of being on the road. In the first episode, Max Linsky, of the podcast Longform, talked to her in Miami about what she was going to have for dinner that evening. As the first presidential candidate to have a campaign podcast, Clinton tried to harness the power of the medium to show a more personable side of herself. Suffice to say, it didnthave the desired effect.

Other lessons from this podcast Clinton is a TED talks fan and has to ration her Elena Ferrante novels. EVB

My
The hosts of My Dad Wrote a Porno.

5 Theres more than one way of motivating your marketings force

Where we learned it My Dad Wrote a Porno

Pots-and-pans sales supremo Belinda Blumenthal can find lust in any situation even when she is lost in an ornamental labyrinth. The superstar of the erotic fiction written by comedian Jamie Mortons father has taught the world that a regional sales meeting has just as much potential for naked fun as a business trip to Amsterdam. Other things she has appropriated into her libidinous realm include a charity tombola, Herb Alpert, a chalet, a pomegranate, a horsebox and any sentence involving the words further access. What she has taught listeners about her ridiculously sexy life is a possibility unsavoury, but via Mortons podcast it has brought a whole lot of mirth.

Other lessons from this podcast There is such a thing as a vaginal eyelid; never read erotic fiction written by your papa. Hannah Verdier

6 Sacha Baron Cohen has been known to use a getaway car

Where we learned it WTF

Marc Marons WTF can be off-putting: the hosts 15 -minute opening monologue and guitar jams are often enough to deter new listeners. But when it comes to teasing out colourful details from the careers of some of Hollywoods funniest and finest, Maron is the master. Grimsby may have bombed in the cinemas, but it was worth it for the interview Baron Cohen did with Maron to promote the cinema. The best bits were the details of the logistical difficulties of inducing Brno, from how a redneck fighting crowd were deceived into watching a homoerotic cavort to how Baron Cohen managed to escape Kansas police after being caught with, among other things, a pedal-powered sex machine in a hotel room.( He had a auto waiting outside with the engine running .)

Other lessons from this podcast Asking what peoples mothers were like rarely gets a dull answer; if you have the US president over to record in your garage, youd better have nice neighbours; William Friedkin is the best storyteller in Hollywood. WD

Alix
Alix Fox looks into peoples sexuality lives. Photograph: Ken McKay/ Rex/ Shutterstock

7 Having two vaginas doesnt mean you can have vaginal sexuality with two men at the same time

Where we learned it Close Encounters from the Guardian

Alix Fox pries into the complicated and fascinating lives of people for whom sexuality is not always altogether straightforward, from a polyamorous couple to a man paralysed from the waist down just before his honeymoon. An extraordinary interview with double-barrelled Hazel, who talked openly about the effects her condition has had on her and may have on her if she wants to have infants is the standout so far.

Other lessons from this podcast Russian-doll-style dildos can cure vaginismus; having cold feet can help to delay an orgasm. LH

8 The search for a fifth meat continues

Where we learned it The Beef and Dairy Network podcast

The centuries-old assumption that there are only four meats beef, lamb, pork and chicken is disintegrating after unconfirmed reports that the European Space Agency has identified a mysterious fifth meat. The Beef and Dairy Network podcast, produced by comedian Ben Partridge, is the No 1 podcast for those involved or only interested in the production of beef animals and dairy herds. Featuring guest appearances from agricultural experts such as Josie Long, and attracting fans including Miranda Sawyer, it is a surreal beefstravaganza.

Other lessons from this podcast According to Beef and Dairy Network sponsor Mitchells, 90% of livestock can kick through a ships hull after simply one month of taking hoof-strengthening supplement Steel Hoof Deluxe. EVB

A
Dont set this cow in your ships hull. Photo: Brian Brown/ Getty Images

9 John Oliver is not dead

Where we learned it The Bugle

For a decade, long-time comedy partners John Oliver and Andy Zaltzman set the world to rights via the medium of their audio newspaper for a visual world. Their riffs on anything from civil liberties( Like puppies, John, we love our own, but we get genuinely vexed when other people civil liberties keep shitting on our lawns) to Texas barbecues( All I know is this, Andy: if I was a cow, and I knew that I could savour like that, Id find it very hard to make a coherent suit for not being immediately killed and slow-cooked) often constructed the present the funniest thing you could get on Wi-Fi. With Oliver having left the Daily Show to front his own depict on HBO, the Bugle went into satirical hibernation. It awoke in mid-October, just in time for a political event so ridiculous that even Zaltzman at his most surreal couldnt have imagined it. The pods Have I Got News for You-style rotating guest co-hosts now include US comics Wyatt Cenac and Hari Kondabolu, as well as Brit Nish Kumar and brilliant Indian standup Anuvab Pal. They dont know each other as well as best friends Zaltzman and Oliver, but perhaps the other co-host, Andys sister Helen, could claim an advantage on that front. The Bugle is dead, long live the Bugle.

Other lessons from this podcast Bashar al-Assad bought LMFAOs Im Sexy and I Know It as the Syrian civil war raged. WD

10 A bloke running a driving school in Acton, west London, was also helping to prop up the death penalty in the US

Where we learned it More Perfect

In a residential area of west London, inside a build with a banner that reads Elgone Driving Academy, is a guy in his 50 s who looks a bit like William Hurt and who was the one-man operation helping to provide the narcotics used for capital punishment in the US. That was until a human rights charity alerted the UK government to his pharmaceutical broom closet of death. In the inaugural episode of More Perfect, a Radiolab spin-off looking at how US supreme court cases affect lives miles away from the bench, the presenters investigated those three little words from the US constitution: cruel and unusual.

Other lessons from this podcast An unusual 911 call made in Houston, Texas, in 1998, led to one of the most important LGBTQ rights decisions in the courts history, effectively building homosexual relations a basic civil right. EVB

11 The political insiders term for people panicking about a Trump win was bedwetters

Where we learned it Keepin it 1600

A politics podcast hosted by Barack Obamas former speechwriter and a senior communications adviser ought to scream wonkishness, but Jon Favreau and Dan Pfeiffer may be the two most engaging analysts of a bonkers electoral campaign. Having been at the heart of two US election storms, they alongside other hosts Jon Lovett and Tommy Vietor know, inside-out, how this world works and share it. Their near certainty about a Clinton win up to the morning of the election attained 1600 one of the most reassuring political podcasts you could listen to and stimulate their morning-after mea culpa on 9 November all the more extraordinary. Now its genuinely time to wet the bed.

Other lessons from this podcast The Obama team realised it was impossible to refute crazy lies about its candidate after Fox News said in 2008 that the young Obama had been raised a Muslim when the team complained, they were told that it was an amusement demonstrate. WD

12 Billy Joel has really soft hands

Where we learned it Two Dope Queens

Comedians and co-podcast hosts Phoebe Robinson and Jessica Williams went where two black girls have never gone before a Billy Joel concert. They sneaked in their ros in suntan lotion bottles bought on Amazon the kind that get white daughters, watching the Shins, through Coachella. And, having been given front-row tickets because Billy likes to see pretty females up at the front, they got to shake his baby-soft hands. If thats not informative enough for you, listen to the other episodes of this snort-out-loud-funny podcast from WNYC and hear some of New Yorks best female comedians talking about sex, romance, race, hair journeys and living in the city.

Other lessons from this podcast Pierce Brosnans volcano thriller Dantes Peak has a lot to tell us about how far we have come since the 90 s; talcum powder is the best method to deal with boob sweat. EVB

13 Tar heroin smells just like capers

Where we learned it Guys We Fucked

Corinne Fisher and Krystyna Hutchinson host the anti-slut-shaming podcast, featuring interviews with everyone from Jon Ronson to Stoya( and, as the title gently indicates, people with whom they have had sexuality ). Their interview with Wendi Kent or, as they call her, White Precious who photographs protesters outside abortion clinics, revealed the reason she can no longer feed capers and what its like to have sex when youre homeless. But its not all heavy-going. The episode titles alone are a treat good luck concealing You didnt go to France because you wanted to masturbate ?, His pubes were haunted? and Period sex: supposes? from fellow commuters.

Other lessons from this podcast DIY HIV tests can be done at home( or on-air) with a mouth swab; comedians on the circuit all hook up with each other. LH

Sex
There is such a this as too much SatC2 I mean, you knew that already, right? Photograph: Allstar/ Warner/ Sportsphoto Ltd

14 You can watch Sex and the City 2 too many times

Where we learned it The Worst Idea of All Time

A lot of period, attempt and fund, especially fund, went into making this film, tells Guy Montgomery. Weve just opened up the most disgusting can of worms. Theres no need to watch SatC2 because he and Tim Batt have done it more than 50 periods for the sake of their podcast( they did the same with Grown Ups 2 ). Mirandas nanny Magda is a spy who is gradually poisoning her, Charlotte is the other one and the whole thing is crying out for the kind of dialogue that induced the TV series great.

Other lessons from this podcast We Are Your Friends is next on your hatewatch list. HV

15 You can have a podcast about a podcast

Where we learned it Slates Serial Spoiler Specials

Slates week-by-week analysis of Serial, 2014 s podcast preoccupation, is perfect for when everyone you know is listening far too slowly offering tale recaps, whodunnit theories and criticisms of the host, Sarah Koenig. Not to mention excavating deep down into Reddit rabbit pits about the two cases covered in so far.

Other lessons from this podcast The cow birth in season two can be seen as an agricultural metaphor for the militarys response to Bowe Bergdahls disappearance; its almost impossible to map a timeline via audio. LH

16 Moby is a CD thief

Where we learned it Heavyweight

Jonathan Goldsteins Heavyweight aims to the tell the stories of people whose lives have taken a wrong turning somewhere. One of these was to reunited his 80 -year-old father with his elder friend before it was too late. Another was to reunite his friend Gregor who is haunted by the moment he loaned a box of CDs to a techno-producer friend. The friend, was, of course, Moby, who employed many of them as the basis for his squillion-selling Play. Gregor doesnt want royalties he just wants his CDs back. And Goldstein helps him get them.

Other lessons from this podcast Tracking down your school bullies is an uncomfortable eye-opener( as demonstrated by Julia in episode seven ). HV

17 You can have an -Alist cast in a podcast drama

Where we learned it Homecoming

Although Serial was basically a piece of investigative journalism, its format proved that podcasting didnt need to be limited in its sort. Gimlet Media, a specialist podcasting company, emerged around the same hour as that NPR made and proved its ambitions in the field. Its scripted drama, Homecoming, aimed straight for the stars with a cast including Catherine Keener, Star Wars Oscar Isaac and David Schwimmer. The story flips between Keeners characters work at an experimental facility that helps soldiers incorporate back in local communities and her present-day life as a waitress. There are plenty of cliffhangers helping to tell the story of what happened in between.

Other lessons from this podcast You dont mess with David Schwimmer. As Colin Belfast, he oozes rage and has the air of a human on the leading edge. HV

18, 19, 20 France buys in most of its frogs legs only one person called Oscar has won an Oscar Donald, Huey, Dewey and Louie Duck are the most reprinted comic book characters( that arent superheroes) of all time

Where we learned it Answer Me This !

Helen Zaltzman and Olly Mann( plus Martin the soundman) solve listeners queries on a fortnightly basis with questions ranging from the practical to the ethical to the ridiculous. Suffice to say, you are able to learnt more listening to them while doing the washing up than from Heart FM. You will also learn that drunken voicemails are welcome, especially from Dave from Smethwick and Graham from Canada.( Its Oscar Hammerstein II, by the way .) LH

The Guardian publishes a wide range of award-winning podcasts daily, from Football Weekly to the Guardian Books podcast, all of which are available on our site , iTunes and other leading podcast platforms .

Read more: www.theguardian.com

‘I was nothing more than a common thief’: master of Fleet Street’s dark arts uncovers trade secrets

Named in the Leveson inquiry into press ethics, and mentioned in volumes on blagging, John Ford speaks out for the first time about how he thought he was working in the public interest for the Sunday Times but now regrets much of what he did

It was a passion that John Ford first cultivated around the kitchen table as small children. He and others in his family were encouraged to try on different accents for fun; a gift for mimicry that defined Ford on the path to becoming one of the masters of Fleet Street’s notorious” darknes arts “.

He has now come forward for the first time to speak publicly about how he use his skill to obtain by subterfuge the personal financial details of hundreds of targets, from cabinet ministers to publishers, businessmen and celebrities.

In an interview with the Guardian, this self-styled” Beckham of the blaggers” describes in detail his work between 1995 and 2010, the techniques and cons he developed. He worked for private investigator but his principal client, accounting for half of his run, he says, was the Sunday Times.

He tricked call centre staff and company employees, typically using a fake identity, to procure bank statements, mortgage records, utility bills and ex-directory numbers. He blagged unpublished autobiographies from publishers, emptied the bins of the powerful in pursuit of secrets.

At the time, he did not question the morality of what he was doing. He believed he was exposing narratives in the public interest. He still feels pride over some of the tales he was involved in such as terrorism and political fund but is going public out of a sense of remorse over others.” I am ashamed ,” he says.

” To their own families, I was proudly referred to as John the journalist; the fact that I worked for the Sunday Times was a source of great kudos and respectability. But I was untrained, untutored and I was nothing more than a common burglar, even though I tried to dignify my activities as artistry under the catch-all title of blagger ,” says Ford, who was first introduced to the Guardian by Byline Media.

Ford ran off the books for the Rupert Murdoch-owned newspaper, never entering the home office, but earned, he estimates PS40, 000 a year from the title alone. He says he targeted the most powerful people of the era: Tony Blair, Gordon Brown, William Hague, John Prescott, the former head of MI6 and celebrities such as Paul McCartney at the time of his wedding to Heather Mills.

” It is such a rarified skill merely a very few people were any good at it ,” he tells. He counts himself as among the highest, partly because- having been at a private school and university- he could do Home Counties as well as working-class.” I was a posh blagger .” He boasts:” My failure rate was minimal .”

The controversy over newspaper ethics has been raging for more than a decade, focused on phone hacking and to a lesser extent the use of private investigators. Ford’s name has been briefly referenced in both Nick Davies’s book Flat Earth News and at the Leveson inquiry.

But the 52 -year-old has never spoken out before, and he believes his narrative represents something new:” It was about the tabloids, the red-tops. But it was about the posh papers too. “Its about” the Sunday Times, a paper with an estimable history and heritage .”

Ford was brought up in a family of fairground travellers who gave up the straying life to settle in south Wales, where his father ran a fruit machine business. In the evenings, when his father came home, one source of entertainment was doing accents.” The children would sit on a bench at supper and dad would say:’ Do an Australian ‘. Then Scottish. Birmingham. Manchester. South African. Dutch. French. I had an ear for it ,” tells Ford.

This led him to try acting, after studying drama and English at Bristol university. He worked for a theatre company and did some standup comedy around London but struggled financially. By chance, in the mid-9 0s, he bumped into an old university friend who, knowing he was an actor, asked him to help out at an office of a private investigator, making a phone call pretending to be Nigerian. That led to work for another private investigator, based in Croydon. That company was used by the Sunday Times and a professional relationship began.

His first big success for the Sunday Times came in 1997 when he penetrated a blind trust set up for Labour donors by Lord Levy, one of Tony Blair’s main fundraisers. Soon after this, in 1998, according to Ford, the Sunday Times decided to bypass the private investigator’s office and commission him directly.

Ford worked on story after story; invoices indicate his work was frequent and sustained. He says he penetrated Gordon Brown’s bank and mortgage account in late 1999 as the Sunday Times tried to find out if there was anything suspicious in the acquisition of a property by the then chancellor a few years earlier from the estate of the controversial owned of Daily Mirror Robert Maxwell. He found nothing untoward. The newspaper wrote a tale in January 2000 about how Brown bought the flat more cheaply than the prevailing market price.” What right did I have to look at the chancellor’s bank account to stand up a non-story ?” Ford now says.

Blagging- employing subterfuge to obtain private information from banks, mortgage companies or utility firms- is illegal under the Data Protection Act 1998, which came into force in March 2000. But there is an exemption for newspapers if private datum is held or obtained for the purpose of journalism with a view to publication and with a reasonable belief that the publication is” justified in the public interest “.

Ford says he suggested to the Sunday Times stealing rubbish in the hope of receiving secrets. He thought it was an original ploy, unaware that Benjamin” Benji The Binman” Pell was already engaged in a similar operation on behalf of newspapers( including, on at the least one occasion, the Guardian ). In November 1999, Pell pleaded guilty to five countings of theft when caught trying to take rubbish from a central London law firm, and was fined PS20.

Ford said the Sunday Times drew up a hitlist of a dozen prominent figures in the Labour government and they targeted bins in the spring and summertime of 2000. He hired a friend, whom he calls George, a student at the time, who helped him in what they refer to as “bin-spinning”. He and Ford would rifle through the rubbish in Ford’s office or living room.

It was Alastair Campbell’s bins that demonstrated the most productive; the refuse yielding a string of memorandas written by New Labour pollster Philip Gould.” Campbell was a chucker, Gould was a shredder ,” Ford remembers. A string of tales followed in the early summer of 2000, such as:” Secret memo demonstrates Labour fear of Hague ,” on 28 May and:” Secret memo tells Blair is out of touch ,” on 11 June. Their true provenance was not recognise, Ford says.

Ford says he was tasked- typically several times a week- to obtain information for the Sunday Times. Invoices retained by Ford from the period confirm his run was frequent and sustained; he says he was paid between PS80 to PS120 for obtaining an ex-directory number and from PS120 to PS250 to get into a UK bank account rising to PS350 for international accounts. There were extra payments for more complex jobs.

Journalists who worked in the newsroom say his existence was an open secret. Junior reporters who wished to use him had to check with the newsdesk for approving and were told never to write his name down or chore details on email. Ford said that he want to get take details of petitions only over the phone to keep activities discreet.

William
Ford impersonated William Hague to get into his bank and charge card accounts. Photograph: Dan Kitwood/ Getty Images

” In those days, you could get anything. There is one basic law of the blag. And that is to give something to someone. If you ring up and tell I want, you don’t get.

When you ring up you say:’ Hello I am ringing to hand myself in. I am sure I owe you some money. Appearing at my direct debits on the 23 rd, the money should have gone to you and it has not gone through .’ And they would say:’ Oh no, it has come through.

“‘ What do you mean? From my kind code 20 23 31? Oh, no, sort code 64.’ I would say,’ From account 5721.’ And they would go:’ No, account number …” I would say:’ Thanks very much.’

” The general sign-off was:’ You don’t don’t how helpful you been .'”

Ford was briefly referenced at the Leveson Inquiry by John Witherow, who edited the Sunday Times between 1995 and 2013. When requested information about Ford, Witherow said in January 2012 that Ford was used on” various investigations “. Ford says he never gratified or spoke to Witherow, who now edits the Times.

At one point, in the early part of the last decade, he impersonated William Hague to get into his bank account and credit card repeatedly over a week following a tip-off from a Sunday Times reporter. Ford says he supposed his Hague accent was good enough to fool people.” I enjoyed being William Hague and the thrill of being William Hague .” No evidence was found to back up the tip-off, however.” It was grossly invasive, shameful, immoral, wrong and it was not news .”

Ford feelings particularly bad about one narrative in particular. An employee for Mercedes Benz “losing ones” task as a result of one of the blags. Ford procured the listing of prospective purchasers for a new Maybach supercar in June 2002 by posing as a German-accented manufacturer of personalised keyfobs, asking to be sent a listing of their names so they could be sure the spellings were correct.” The human was sacked, and what happened to him I don’t know. Did he get re-employed, did he get divorced, did it ruining their own lives ?”

Models
Ford procured the list of prospective purchasers for a new Maybach supercar in June 2002. Photograph: Byun Yeong-Wook/ AFP/ Getty Images

It was stressful run and gradually took its toll. Ford himself talks about blagging as acting, describing how anxious he would be” before he went on “. He told:” On Tuesday, you feel sick, on a Wednesday and Thursday, you think:’ I have to do it .’ On Friday you have to only pick up the damn phone. By Friday evening you are flying, you feel like God, you are cycling home. That was the game .”

Ford occasionally worked for other commercial and media clients too. They included the Telegraph, the Express and the BBC. At one point, he indirectly worked for the Guardian. In 2000, he was asked by Ciex, a corporate intelligence firm, to assist in the production of a due diligence report about Monsanto, the controversial GM agriculture company. Although Ford did not know it at the time, Ciex’s client was the Guardian. Ford was asked to target bins of people at Bell Pottinger, the financial PR firm that worked for Monsanto at the time.

Nor was he the only off-the-books private investigator. A private investigator called Steve Whittamore, whose property was raided in 2003, was used by a string of newspapers including the Observer to procure ex-directory and vehicle ownership and other personal information.

The Observer built 103 requests for information between 1999 and 2003, and an independent review subsequently concluded that” the Observer overwhelmingly use Steve Whittamore’s services in their efforts to expose public impropriety or crime “.

As for Ford, the fun began to go out of the job about a decade ago. He felt trapped by the regular flow of money. He took valium, sometimes in small doses mixed with Red Bull; sometimes more. The job that led to his undoing was his attempt to obtain an advance copy of Tony Blair’s autobiography in August 2010, coming after the Sunday Times had unsuccessfully bid PS500, 000 for the serialisation rights. Blair had instead said he would donate royalties to the British Legion.

Tony
The task that led to his undoing was his attempt to obtain an advance transcript of Tony Blair’s autobiography in August 2010. Photograph: Oli Scarff/ Getty Images

Ford said he did not initially want to take over the task, but was talked around over several telephone call from the Sunday Times. He was told how much the book was wanted. Describing how he tried to blag the electronic proof, he said:” I bided up all night. I was in debt. I thought: I’m going to get this fucking volume. I rang every Random House office around the globe as the sunshine came up .”

Email exchanges with a Sunday Times reporter that were subsequently recovered by police detail a desperate worldwide search by Ford for a transcript in Britain, Australia, India and elsewhere.

Random House asked the City of London police to analyse the origin of the repeated calls and they traced the blagging to Ford’s property in Somerset.” I think they were surprised to find somebody so well-spoken when they apprehended me ,” he said. The Sunday Times paid for a lawyer, although Ford did not admit to working for the newspaper. He received a caution two years later, having been paid PS2, 100 for the disastrous blag.

It was an abrupt objective to a decade-and-a-half’s work for the Sunday Times. During that time he was never invited into the Sunday Times newsroom and instead fulfilled reporters outside the Sunday Times office in Wapping, at a saloon or a McDonald’s.” I never received a byline ,” he tells and no public acknowledgment of his run. But he regarded himself as part of the team, meeting reporters socially, on occasion attending the Christmas party.

Last night, News UK issued a statement telling:” The Sunday Times has a strong record of investigative journalism over decades and has hired many contributors and researchers to work on tales, or parts of tales.

” The paper strongly repudiates the accusation that it has in the past retained or commissioned any individual to act illegally.

” Some accusations related to the research work of John Ford have been aired previously and we cannot comment on the specifics of these new allegations, which all predate 2011.”

After the caution, Ford’s health suffered and he was drinking too much. But he gradually was just thinking about going public, and last year he initially approached Byline Media, a crowdsourced website that had written about some of the fallout from the phone-hacking affair. Byline, after a year’s investigation, in turn approached the Guardian.

Seeking personal redemption, he has decided to become a whistleblower.” It has been a long time coming for me. I am 52. I have three children. I want to be a decent mother. I want my mothers to be proud of me. I want to step out of the darkness .” He added:” It is time to tell the truth and make amends .”

Early on Wednesday, the former deputy prime minister John Prescott said he believed he was one of John Ford’s victims over a story about the value of his grace and favour flat.

Speaking to BBC Radio 4′ s Today programme, he said:” I surely felt it at the time, when the various narratives were put out by the Sunday Times. Here’s the man who has had a sentence, is a man who said he committed criminal acts paid for by the Sunday Times on what they called fishing expedition. It is now[ called] blagging. Well, I suffered under hacking. I’m now into blagging, so I’m taking legal advice. Are these tales true ?”

Read more: www.theguardian.com

Time 100: FGM campaigner Jaha Dukureh constructs prestigious list

US campaigner induced Obama take action on female genital mutilation, and get practice banned in the Gambia

Anti-FGM campaigner Jaha Dukureh has been named one of the worlds more influential leaders by Time magazine alongside John Kerry, Angela Merkel, Aung San Suu Kyi, Bernie Sanders and Christine Lagarde.

Dukureh, the lead campaigner in the Guardians global information campaign to end female genital mutilation, was honoured in particular for her work in the US and the Gambia but is now campaigning to end the practice worldwide in a generation, employing her experiences as a survivor to build public supporting.

She first came to prominence with the success of her change.org petition, which received more than 220,000 signatures, asking the Obama administration to conduct a new prevalence survey into the current scope of FGM in the United States.

The
The Guardians editor-in-chief, Katharine Viner, with Jaha Dukureh. Photograph: Alicia Canter for the Guardian

Now based in Atlanta, Dukureh has become the leading campaigner against FGM in the Gambia. She is of a new generation of young women in the country who are working through the media to make sure that the mutilation they have suffered is not recurred on their daughters.

In 2015 her campaign led to the Gambia announcing a ban on FGM.

Maggie OKane, coordinator of the Guardian campaign to end FGM, told: The Time 100 award for Jaha Dukureh puts FGM out there slap bang in the middle of human rights agenda, where it should be when 200 million girls and women are mutilated around the world today.

Last year FGM was banned in Nigeria, which joined 18 other African countries that have proscribed the practice, including Central African Republic, Egypt and South Africa.

The Guardian has been working with activists like Dukureh in the UK, US, Kenya the Gambia and Nigeria. The information campaign, supported by the Human Dignity Foundation, begins work in June in Sierra Leone, where 88% of daughters are subjected to FGM which means the forcible removal, usually with a razor blade, of the clitoris and the labia and the sewing up of the vagina.

Somalia, which has the highest prevalence of FGM in the world, has indicated it would like to end the practice, despite significant resistance in the country. Currently, 98% of daughters aged between four and 11 being submitted to FGM in Somalia.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

Facebook break can boost wellbeing, examine suggests

Research procures leaving social network for a week increases life gratification, particularly among heavy users and lurkers

Taking a breaking from Facebook can boost emotional wellbeing and life gratification, with the effects especially pronounced among persons who lurk on the social network without actively engaging with others, a study suggests.

The research by the University of Copenhagen demonstrated the effects of quitting for a week is likewise strong among heavy users and those who jealousy their Facebook friends, is recommended that people who pore irritably over the posts of others may benefit the most.

The reports writer, Morten Tromholt, from the universitys sociology department, said the findings suggested that changes in behaviour for example, heavy users reducing their time spent on Facebook, or lurkers actively engaging could yield positive results.

But he indicated that people could find it difficult to change their behaviour 13% of the studys participants who were supposed to be taking a break admitted to using the social network so quitting may be necessary.

The study, published in the periodical Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, involved 1,095 people, 86% of whom were women. They were haphazardly assigned to two groups: one that continued using Facebook as normal and one that stopped employing the social network for a week.

On average, the participants were aged 34, had 350 Facebook friends and spend just over an hour a day on the social network, which had 1.79 billion monthly active users in the third quarter of this year.

Questionnaires conducted at the beginning and end of the week indicated that taking a breach from the site increased life gratification and positive emotions. The effects of ceasing were found to be greater among heavy users, passive users and the individuals who envied others on the social network. There was no positive effect of taking a break for sunlight users.

Tromholt wrote: To induce things clear, if one is a heavy Facebook user, one should use Facebook less to increase ones wellbeing.

And if one tends to feel envy when on Facebook, one should avoid browsing the sections( or specific friends) on Facebook causing this resentment. And if one uses Facebook passively, one should reduce this kind of behaviour.

Due to habits, practicalities it may be difficult to change ones route of using Facebook. If this is the case, one should consider quitting Facebook for good.

Previous analyses have had mixed outcomes on the link between Facebook use and wellbeing. Some garnered similar findings, but others find no link and some found that time spent on the social network can boost wellbeing.

Brenda Wiederhold, the editor-in-chief of Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, told: This study found that lurking on Facebook may cause negative emotions. However, on the bright side previous studies have shown actively connecting with close friends, whether in real life or on Facebook, may actually increase ones sense of wellbeing.

Tromholt suggested that future surveys should investigate the effect of ceasing Facebook for a greater length of day and look at other social networks, including Instagram, Snapchat and Twitter.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

Prince Harry a breath of fresh air? No, a chip off the old block | Catherine Bennett

His offensive gaffe on Today about Meghan Markles family exposed he has much in common with his father

Given the lavish, generally positive coverage of Prince Harry’s guest editorship of Today , the BBC’s new head of news could surely be forgiven for extending the scheme to many more flagship demonstrates. Assuming, that is, the royal internships are not reserved for family members no more than fifth or sixth in line to the throne.

If not, with the breadth of available talent, there is no reason to delay Princess Beatrice’s guest editorship of In Our Time or for You and Yours to put off showcasing Princess Michael of Kent’s many passions with a topical phone-in .” Has an innocently racist piece of vintage jewellery ever landed you in difficulty? If so, you’re not alone !”

On television, trained BBC employees should console themselves, when Princess Charlotte is brought in over their heads at Daily Politics , that some of their print colleagues have for months been deferring to the Standard ‘ s guest editor George Osborne, an amateur lacking even a compensatory wardrobe of adorable smocked dresses.

Whatever the career options for his extended family, Prince Harry’s Today contribution seems triumphantly to have consolidated his claim to the irregularly bestowed royal title” a breath of fresh air “. Meanwhile, a dynasty long scared into shyness by the still-suppressed 1969 documentary, Royal Family , then by Charles’s subsequent artlessness with a Dimbleby, received information that “the member states national” broadcaster can, with careful guidance, be reduced to a docile, reverential mess.

Perhaps, whatever Walter Bagehot told of attempts to clarify Queen Victoria’s activities, some daylight can usefully be let in” upon magic “. Maybe David Attenborough was similarly overprotective when, after Royal Family showed the Queen having breakfast, he reportedly told the director:” The whole organization depends on mystique and the tribal chief in his shanty. If any member of the tribe ever watches inside the shack, then the whole system of the tribal chiefdom is injury and the tribe eventually disintegrates .”

True, Today only got as far as the fifth/ sixth in line to the mystic Windsor hut, but the answers to Harry’s boyish bants-” boxers or briefs ?” – his optimism, his air of wholly sharing the nervousness of the younger generation, indicates, so far, undiminished esteem for an plainly compassionate royal who acts, various kinds of , normal. That Harry has reportedly had to overcome palace opposition in order to speak freely on mental health, and to defend his fiance, has only added, to judge by the Today treatment, to his princely authority.

Harry
Harry interviews Barack Obama in Toronto. Photo: HO/ AFP/ Getty Images

Further burnished by his exchange with an obliging President Obama, Harry may now have accomplished the yet more staggering accomplishment, on behalf of Princes Charles, Andrew and Edward, plus any number of royal twerp and dependants with still flimsier claims to nation supporting, of stimulating the whole institution appear, however unfeasibly, enlightened- a project that can only benefit from his matrimony to Meghan Markle, a critic of Trump. As with the couple’s demonstrativeness when they announced their involvement, and their promise of some kind of team work, the BBC guest editorship, even as reviewed by usually egalitarian sources, introduces a savior of the empire upon whom republicans can respectably dote.

There has been nothing like it since 1976, when Prince Charles, allegedly dashing, and freshly retired from the navy, defied hostile older courtiers to establish his Prince’s Trust. For this, the prince, as hard as this might now be to believe, has also been feted as a friend to the forgotten. Catherine Mayer, Charles’s biographer, quotes Jon Snow, who was summoned, as a young charity worker, to the palace and told by the prince:” I’ve brought you here because I want to do something with my life. I want to start something which will make a difference .” The trust would devote small awards to young people between 15 and 25 who might be, among other things,” alienated or repudiated “.

That the Prince’s Trust has, admirably and as intended , now helped getting on for 900,000 young people, has not, as Charles’s Today appearance possibly reminded listeners , noticeably endeared its creator to the nation. Maybe, even minus his crippling self-pity and strangulated delivery, his love of private trains and fatal weakness for Camilla Parker-Bowles, Charles’s early lucidity of purpose, about who and how he wanted to help, would always have been obscured by rival preoccupations. The trust has been overshadowed by his recommend to interfere in politics, to slag off doctors and designers and to offer, in some less definable, though reliably nonsensical, style, de haut en bas spiritual instruction.

Even offered the chance, on Today , to say something clear about pollution, Charles-” Father, Pa”, as Harry addressed him- embarked, in a style that built me feel, for the first time, for his duchess, on a homily concerning Nature.

” The future lies in working in far greater harmony with nature ,” he told his spellbind younger son,” and trying to ensure more successfully that our own economy better imitations and mirrors nature’s brilliant economy .”

Whether filial regard or lack of time explains the oversight, Prince Harry did not press Pa for details, an approach that might in, in any case, have struck a disagreeable note in a programme plainly modelled, in interrogative words, on Pathe newsreels of the mid-2 0th century. Although, even then, you wonder if a presenter would have concluded an interview with the head of the Metropolitan police with:” Prince Harry, our guest editor, asked me particularly to tell you that he wants to thank you for all the run that you do and that all your officers do, particularly at this time of year .” Her box of Quality Street and a card could be picked up on Commissioner Dick’s way out.

In the closest the prince himself came to being interviewed, he parried humble investigations about Ms Markle’s induction programme, one already advanced to the level of inexplicable hats and demure curtseys. How was her Christmas with the Windsors? His reply was perhaps the most illuminate of the programme, though not inevitably in a good way for believers in Meghan’s potential- with Harry- to make a difference.” No, seem, she’s done an absolutely amazing chore ,” he told.” She’s getting in there and it’s the family I suppose that she’s never had .”

If it did not replicate Charles’s terms to Camilla (” your greatest achievement is to love me “), Harry’s bizarre inversion of the truth- that a notoriously tortured family with purely hereditary claims to eminence has yet to demonstrate why anyone as impressive as Ms Markle should submit to its weirder rites- is the first sign, in some years, that his fans may, reluctantly, have to manage expectations. Was it, in that case, even a good notion to let in daylight upon Harry? Much, if not all his appeal, for the Windsorphobic has resided in vague hopes that he is, more Diana than Charles, a winningly audacious misfit.

Like Prince Harry’s laudable, but strictly- in his family- conventional focus on the environment and African wildlife, on youth causes and on the military, his perception of his partner’s good fortune may indicate the opposite. Affinities with Pa could go style beyond a shared reverence for nature’s brilliant economy.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

There’s a search for a fifth meat- and 19 other things podcasts taught us in 2016

Whether its asking what happens when you watch Sex and the City 2 more than 50 periods or which Oscar has won an Oscar, theres no question a podcast somewhere hasnt answered

1 Richard Ayoade used a ThunderCats duvet cover until he was in his late 20 s

Where we learned it The Adam Buxton podcast

Adam Buxtons life-affirming, jingle-packed ramble chats with his celebrity guests are a constant delight. In this two-parter, the multi-talented Ayoade went into everything from the high levels of pillows to the reaction to his notoriously awkward interview with Krishnan Guru-Murthy. As funny as the pod is, you are able to learn a lot, too from Buxtons honest discussions of sorrow when his dad died to how upsetting Sara Pascoe find it when people construct clicky sticky noises with their mouths.

Other lessons from this podcast Louis Theroux does a fine rendition of Yes Sir, I Can Boogie. Ellie Violet Bramley

Malcolm
Journalist and writer Malcolm Gladwell. Photo: Anne Bailey

2 One of the biggest car recollects in history may have been caused by drivers pressing the incorrect pedal

Where we learned it Malcolm Gladwells Revisionist History

If you are familiar with Gladwells work, then Revisionist History is both a treat and familiar territory. The New Yorker writer often takes assumptions and things we might think to be true and unravels them to end up in a different place altogether. In his bestseller Blink, he explained why it might not have been so unusual that an unarmed man was shot 41 times by New York police. In the best episode of Revisionist History, Gladwell seemed back at Toyotas sudden unintended acceleration phenomenon, which led to a gigantic penalty for the car maker. The conclusion after we listen to a 911 call in which a man is driven to his death by a automobile that wont slow down was not that the cars accelerators were sticking, but that drivers unfamiliar with certain autoes were having a brain malfunction that meant they were physically unable to differentiate between the brake and the accelerator.

Other lessons from this podcast American colleges with the nicest canteens are the worst selections for poor students; if you want to score the most free-throws in basketball, do them underarm. Will Dean

3 One day, everyone in Sweden switched to driving on the opposite side of the road

Where we learned it 99% Invisible

You neednt be an architecture or design fanatic to enjoy Roman Marss gentle unpicking of how the world around us came to look and function as it does. As well as stories about the origins of the inflatable men they have outside auto dealers in the US, and why they used to advertise missing children on milk cartons, you can learn about Hgertrafikomlggningen , or H-day 3 September 1967 when everyone in Sweden switched from driving on the left side of the road to the right.

Other lessons from this podcast Californias Salton Sea was formed by mistake; 20 years ago, the world became obsessed with a phone booth in the middle of the Mojave desert. Leah Harper

4 Having your own podcast wont win you an election

Where we learned it With Her

How do we know that Hillary Clinton enjoyed a Cuban sandwich and a beer at the end of a day on the road? Well, she had her own campaign podcast, about the little details of being on the trail. In the first episode, Max Linsky, of the podcast Longform, talked to her in Miami about what she was going to have for dinner that evening. As the first presidential nominee to have a campaign podcast, Clinton tried to harness the power of the medium to presents a more personable side of herself. Suffice to say, it didnthave the desired effect.

Other lessons from this podcast Clinton is a TED talks fan and has to ration her Elena Ferrante fictions. EVB

My
The hosts of My Dad Wrote a Porno.

5 Theres more than one route of motivating your marketings force

Where we learned it My Dad Wrote a Porno

Pots-and-pans sales supremo Belinda Blumenthal can find lust in any situation even when she is lost in an ornamental maze. The starring of the erotic fiction written by comedian Jamie Mortons father has taught the world that a regional marketings seminar has just as much potential for naked fun as a business trip-up to Amsterdam. Other things she has appropriated into her libidinous realm include a charity tombola, Herb Alpert, a chalet, a pomegranate, a horsebox and any sentence involving the words further access. What she has taught listeners about her ridiculously sexy life may be unsavoury, but via Mortons podcast it has brought a whole lot of mirth.

Other lessons from this podcast There is such a thing as a vaginal lid; never read erotic fiction written by your daddy. Hannah Verdier

6 Sacha Baron Cohen has been known to use a getaway car

Where we learned it WTF

Marc Marons WTF can be off-putting: the hosts 15 -minute opening monologue and guitar jams are often enough to deter new listeners. But when it comes to teasing out colorful details from the careers of some of Hollywoods funniest and finest, Maron is the master. Grimsby may have bombed in the cinema, but it was worth it for the interview Baron Cohen did with Maron to promote the movie. The best bits were the details of the logistical difficulties of inducing Brno, from how a redneck fighting crowd were deceived into watching a homoerotic cavort to how Baron Cohen managed to escape Kansas police after being caught with, among other things, a pedal-powered sex machine in a hotel room.( He had a auto waiting outside with the engine operating .)

Other lessons from this podcast Asking what peoples mothers were like rarely gets a dull answer; if you have the US president over to record in your garage, youd better have nice neighbours; William Friedkin is the best storyteller in Hollywood. WD

Alix
Alix Fox looks into people sex lives. Photo: Ken McKay/ Rex/ Shutterstock

7 Having two vaginas doesnt mean you can have vaginal sex with two men at the same time

Where we learned it Close Encounters from the Guardian

Alix Fox pries into the complicated and fascinating lives of people for whom sex is not always solely straightforward, from a polyamorous couple to a human paralysed from the waist down just before his honeymoon. An extraordinary interview with double-barrelled Hazel, who talked openly about the effect her condition has had on her and may have on her if she wants to have children is the standout so far.

Other lessons from this podcast Russian-doll-style dildos can cure vaginismus; having cold feet can help to delay an orgasm. LH

8 The search for a fifth meat continues

Where we learned it The Beef and Dairy Network podcast

The centuries-old assumption that there are only four meat beef, lamb, pork and chicken is disintegrating after unconfirmed reports that the European Space Agency has identified a mysterious fifth meat. The Beef and Dairy Network podcast, produced by comedian Ben Partridge, is the No 1 podcast for those involved or only interested in the production of beef animals and dairy herds. Featuring guest appearances from agricultural experts such as Josie Long, and attracting fans including Miranda Sawyer, it is a surreal beefstravaganza.

Other lessons from this podcast According to Beef and Dairy Network sponsor Mitchells, 90% of cattle can kick through a ships hull after merely one month of taking hoof-strengthening supplement Steel Hoof Deluxe. EVB

A
Dont set this cow in your ships hull. Photograph: Brian Brown/ Getty Images

9 John Oliver is not dead

Where we learned it The Bugle

For a decade, long-time comedy partners John Oliver and Andy Zaltzman set the world to rights via the medium of their audio newspaper for a visual world. Their riffs on anything from civil liberties( Like dogs, John, we love our own, but we get genuinely riled when other people civil liberty maintain shitting on our lawns) to Texas barbecues( All I know is this, Andy: if I was a cow, and I knew that I could savor like that, Id find it very hard to make a coherent lawsuit for not being immediately killed and slow-cooked) often induced the reveal the funniest thing you could get on Wi-Fi. With Oliver having left the Daily Show to front his own prove on HBO, the Bugle went into satirical hibernation. It awoke in mid-October, just in time for a political event so ridiculous that even Zaltzman at his most surreal couldnt have imagined it. The pods Have I Got News for You-style rotating guest co-hosts now include US comics Wyatt Cenac and Hari Kondabolu, as well as Brit Nish Kumar and brilliant Indian standup Anuvab Pal. They dont know each other as well as best friends Zaltzman and Oliver, but perhaps the other co-host, Andys sister Helen, could claim an advantage on that front. The Bugle is dead, long live the Bugle.

Other lessons from this podcast Bashar al-Assad bought LMFAOs Im Sexy and I Know It as the Syrian civil war raged. WD

10 A bloke running a driving school in Acton, west London, was also helping to prop up the capital punishment in the US

Where we learned it More Perfect

In a residential area of west London, inside a building with a flag that reads Elgone Driving Academy, is a guy in his 50 s who seems a bit like William Hurt and who was the one-man operation helping to provide the drugs used for capital punishment in the US. That was until a human rights charity alerted the UK government to his pharmaceutical broom closet of demise. In the inaugural episode of More Perfect, a Radiolab spin-off looking at how US supreme court cases affect lives miles away from the bench, the presenters explored those three little words from the US constitution: cruel and unusual.

Other lessons from this podcast An unusual 911 call made in Houston, Texas, in 1998, led to one of the most important point LGBTQ rights decisions in the courts history, effectively constructing homosexual relations a basic civil right. EVB

11 The political insiders term for people panicking about a Trump win was bedwetters

Where we learned it Keepin it 1600

A politics podcast hosted by Barack Obamas former speechwriter and a senior communications adviser ought to shrieking wonkishness, but Jon Favreau and Dan Pfeiffer may be the two most engaging analysts of a bonkers electoral campaign. Having been at the heart of two US election cyclones, they alongside other hosts Jon Lovett and Tommy Vietor know, inside-out, how this world works and share it. Their near certainty about a Clinton win up to the morning of the election attained 1600 one of the most reassuring political podcasts you could listen to and attain their morning-after mea culpa on 9 November all the more extraordinary. Now its really time to wet the bed.

Other lessons from this podcast The Obama team realised it was impossible to refute crazy lies about its candidate after Fox News said in 2008 that the young Obama had been raised a Muslim when the team complained, they were told that it was an amusement depict. WD

12 Billy Joel has really soft hands

Where we learned it Two Dope Queens

Comedians and co-podcast hosts Phoebe Robinson and Jessica Williams ran where two black women have never gone before a Billy Joel concert. They sneaked in their ros in suntan lotion bottles bought on Amazon the kind that get white daughters, watching the Shins, through Coachella. And, having been given front-row tickets because Billy likes to see pretty females up at the front, they got to shake his baby-soft hands. If thats not informative enough for you, listen to the other episodes of this snort-out-loud-funny podcast from WNYC and hear some of New Yorks best female comedians talking about sex, romance, race, hair journeys and living in the city.

Other lessons from this podcast Pierce Brosnans volcano thriller Dantes Peak has a lot to tell us about how far we have come since the 90 s; talcum powder is the best method to deal with boob sweat. EVB

13 Tar heroin smells just like capers

Where we learned it Guys We Fucked

Corinne Fisher and Krystyna Hutchinson host the anti-slut-shaming podcast, featuring interviews with everyone from Jon Ronson to Stoya( and, as the title gently indicates, people with whom they have had sexuality ). Their interview with Wendi Kent or, as they call her, White Precious who photographs protesters outside abortion clinics, exposed the reason she can no longer feed capers and what its like to have sex when youre homeless. But its not all heavy-going. The episode titles alone are a treat good luck disguising You didnt go to France because you wanted to masturbate ?, His pubes were haunted? and Period sex: guess? from fellow commuters.

Other lessons from this podcast DIY HIV tests can be done at home( or on-air) with a mouth swab; comedians on the circuit all hook up with one another. LH

Sex
There is such a this as too much SatC2 I mean, you knew that already, right? Photograph: Allstar/ Warner/ Sportsphoto Ltd

14 You can watch Sex and the City 2 too many times

Where we learned it The Worst Idea of All Time

A lot of time, effort and money, especially money, went into making this film, says Guy Montgomery. Weve just opened up the most disgusting can of worms. Theres no need to watch SatC2 because he and Tim Batt have done it more than 50 days for the sake of their podcast( they did the same with Grown Ups 2 ). Mirandas nanny Magda is a spy who is gradually poisoning her, Charlotte is the other one and the whole thing is exclaiming out for the kind of dialogue that stimulated the TV series great.

Other lessons from this podcast We Are Your Friends is next on your hatewatch listing. HV

15 You can have a podcast about a podcast

Where we learned it Slates Serial Spoiler Specials

Slates week-by-week analysis of Serial, 2014 s podcast obsession, is perfect for when everyone you know is listening far too slowly offering tale recaps, whodunnit theories and critiques of the host, Sarah Koenig. Not to mention excavating deep down into Reddit rabbit holes about the two cases covered in so far.

Other lessons from this podcast The cow birth in season two can be seen as an agricultural metaphor for the militarys response to Bowe Bergdahls disappearance; its almost impossible to map a timeline via audio. LH

16 Moby is a CD thief

Where we learned it Heavyweight

Jonathan Goldsteins Heavyweight aims to the tell the stories of people whose lives have taken a wrong turning somewhere. One of these was to reunited his 80 -year-old father with his elder friend before it was too late. Another was to reunite his friend Gregor who is haunted by the moment he loaned a box of CDs to a techno-producer friend. The friend, was, of course, Moby, who use many of them as the basis for his squillion-selling Play. Gregor doesnt want royalties he only wants his Cds back. And Goldstein helps him get them.

Other lessons from this podcast Tracking down your school bullies is an uncomfortable eye-opener( as demonstrated by Julia in episode seven ). HV

17 You can have an -Alist cast in a podcast drama

Where we learned it Homecoming

Although Serial was essentially a piece of investigative journalism, its format proved that podcasting didnt need to be limited in its sort. Gimlet Media, functional specialists podcasting company, emerged around the same hour as that NPR hit and proved its ambitions in the field. Its scripted drama, Homecoming, aimed straight for the stars with a cast including Catherine Keener, Star Wars Oscar Isaac and David Schwimmer. The tale flips between Keeners characters work at an experimental facility that helps soldiers incorporate back into the community and her present-day life as a waitress. There are plenty of cliffhangers helping to tell the story of what happened in between.

Other lessons from this podcast You dont mess with David Schwimmer. As Colin Belfast, he oozes fury and has the air of a man on the leading edge. HV

18, 19, 20 France buys in most of its frogs legs only one person called Oscar has won an Oscar Donald, Huey, Dewey and Louie Duck are the most reprinted comic book characters( that arent superheroes) of all time

Where we learned it Answer Me This !

Helen Zaltzman and Olly Mann( plus Martin the soundman) solve listeners queries on a fortnightly basis with questions ranging from the practical to the ethical to the ridiculous. Suffice to say, you are able to learnt more listening to them while doing the washing up than from Heart FM. You will also learn that drunken voicemails are greet, especially from Dave from Smethwick and Graham from Canada.( Its Oscar Hammerstein II, by the way .) LH

The Guardian publishes a wide range of award-winning podcasts daily, from Football Weekly to the Guardian Books podcast, all of which are available on our site , iTunes and other resulting podcast platforms .

Read more: www.theguardian.com

M& S drops cauliflower ‘steak’ amid ridicule from customers

Costing double the price of a whole vegetable and shrouded in layers of plastic, clean feeing product fails to make the cut

Marks& Spencer has withdrawn its” cauliflower steak” product from sale after it was ridiculed by customers for its “excessive” plastic packaging and inflated price.

The sliced cauliflower, which comes in plastic packaging with a separate sachet of lemon and herb drizzle, was being sold for twice the price of a whole, single cauliflower at the supermarket chain.

The product had come under fire on social media, with critics describing it as “wasteful” and “ridiculous” and complaining about the volume of packaging used as well as the inflated price. Whole, untrimmed cauliflowers are sold at M& S for PS1- typically for even less at other supermarkets- while the single-slice “steak” version cost shoppers PS2.

Confirming its decision to stop selling the item, a spokesperson for M& S said:” Once we’ve sold the stock that is currently in stores, we won’t be ordering any more of this product. We work hard to create rapid and convenient dinners for customers; however, on this occasion we didn’t get it right. We have launched many other vegetarian dishes that are already demonstrating popular with customers .”

The product was part of the store’s new “Veggie” scope, and was first spotted on Twitter by Rachel Clarke @rachclarke27, who triggered a lengthy thread after tweeting:

Another( Kathryn @ katie2 779) said:” People who buy this must have more fund than sense! What a wasteful item. The quantity of plastic and processing involved in this is ridiculous. Like you say, buy a cauliflower, rinse it and cut( and use all of it ).”

Rival Sainsbury’s also sells a similar product– a pack of two” cauliflower steaks in a herb and spice marinade” for PS1. 80, which is still on its shelves.
Trewin Restorick, chief executive of environmental charity Hubbub, said:” The public is increasingly concerned about the impact plastic packaging has on the environment, and social media gives them a chance to voice their concerns directly to companies. The too packaged, too priced cauliflower steak shows what happens when companies don’t get things right and hopefully it will lead to more environmentally sensible solutions in the future .”

With so-called ” Veganuary” under way and shoppers opting to reduce or cut out meat consumption in favour of ” clean feeing “ selections, supermarkets have been pulling out the stops to offer clients a range of ready-prepared spiralised vegetables- and even “mince” made of pulverised mushrooms and cauliflower and beetroot “rice”- to help them get back into shape after the festive season blowout. But this year has assured a backlash from shoppers complaining on social media about excessive packaging.

The U-turn from M& S arrives as the governmental forces prepares to announce a crackdown on excessive packaging and plastics on Thursday. A Defra spokesperson told:” Everyone has a role to play in tackling the scourge of plastics trash, and industries need to make sure their packaging does not exceed what is required to make sure that the products are safe, hygienic and acceptable for both the product and for the consumer.”

Read more: www.theguardian.com

The Secret to a High Tech Concierge Medical Office? Data

By design, the downtown San Francisco storefront offices of Forward feel more like a spa or a ritzy skin care boutique than a doctors’ office. But the latter thing is true. Despite the sun glistening through floor-to-ceiling windows onto pastel walls, blond-wood surfaces and no check-in desk in sight( attractive, casually dressed-up receptionists with iPads offer you a water ), Forward is a concierge medical service.

Insurance doesn’t get you so much as a tongue depressor down the throat at Forward. But pay $149 a month, and in return you get 24/7 access to staff via SMS and a phone app, more hour with a physician, and an office tricked out with more contraptions than a starship’s sick bay. On uptake, you stand in front of a sensor and put your hand into an orifice; a screen reads out your height, weight, temperature, and blood oxygenation. In the quiz room, you sit in a custom-designed Comfy Chair while a doctor holds a wireless sensor against your chest and your heartbeat unspools on a giant flatscreen. Digital images from your past visits flicker across a timeline made of your health records. The key words of your dialogue scroll past a cartoon of your body, picked up by discrete microphones in the ceiling( transcribed by a little natural language processing and a little bit of person-sitting-in-an-adjacent-room-listening ).

The most interesting part of Forward, though, is invisible. As part of the service, Forward fetches your medical record from all your previous caregivers. Then it digitizes them–often by hand, because of the many, many incompatible data formats that bedevilled medical record-keeping–with whatever genetic info you have, from the rough genotyping of a 23 andMe to a whole genome sequence. And it throws in data from your wearable tech like Fitbits. In short, it’s an integrated digital medical record. Forward only has two offices, in San Francisco and Los Angeles, but even if never becomes a national brand, this idea about data appears more and more like the future.

Forward isn’t the only one chasing that future, of course. This week a start-up called Seqster, for example, went online with a sort of data locker that does something similar. It hoovers in electronic medical records from your past physicians( thanks to agreements with 1,000 providers ), genome sequences, and an array of commercial wearables. It’ll even build on-the-fly visualizations of test outcomes over day, and let you share that data with family members. And it persists even after your demise. “We’ve created this engine where you can aggregate your health data and preserve it and pass it on, creating a multigenerational longitudinal record, ” tells Ardy Arianpour, the CEO. “And we accidentally solved the problem of interoperability , not just of electronic medical data but for genomic data and fitness/ wellness data.”

Seqster and Forward’s record-keeping plan join some really ambitious projects. Verily, the health-focused Google spin-off, has Project Baseline, which employs a clever watch and other tech to collect prospective biometric information on 10,000 people and mesh it with health and genome data. Apple is trying to integrate its Watch with the HealthKit app. Government projects like Emerge and the precision medicine initiative All of Us are trying to figure this out, too. Why? Science! And also fund! And kind of maybe helping the people who contribute the data.

A visit to Forward is indeed pretty cool. Before they opened their first office, Aoun and his squad constructed out a mock-office from 2-by-4s and foamcore in a warehouse. They brought in actual patients talk to doctors, and then had the doctors meet with technologists about the design of the whole thing. The result is indeed slick; the second office is in Los Angeles. “I believe the health care industry takes pride in not caring about the experience a little, ” tells Adrian Aoun, Forward’s CEO. And if fixing that entails pandering in a little theater, well, what do you expect when investors include Ashton Kutcher and Matthew McConaughey? Part of a great experience, says Aoun, is “high tech and futuristic screens that look like Star Trek.”

It’s in the service of a larger objective. “In the world of Silicon Valley, I’m used to everyone looking at all the problems , no matter how daunt, and just saying,’ No problem, I get this, ’” Aoun tells. “It seems like health care, for some reason, we haven’t made that big an attack on the problem.”

If that feels like it perhaps minimise the task of the, like, everyone, Aoun admits he doesn’t have outcome measures that depict greater success than a traditional practice–yet. The place has only been open for a few months, after all, and he tells the team will be looking at how their metrics for care match up with the government’s official Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set. “We need hour, ” Aoun says. “Our engagement metrics are through the roof.”

No question, Forward( and other concierge-style practices like One Medical or MD2) want to benefit their patients. So, ah, about that: “You get longer visits, greater acceptability of your clinician, and more patient-centered care, quote-unquote, ” says Caleb Alexander, co-director of the Center for Drug Safety and Effectiveness at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and lead author, over a decade ago, of a paper on concierge medicine characteristics. “But no one can tell you the outcomes. Take whatever you hear about the outcomes with a grain of salt, because there have not been rigorous analyzes, let alone randomized analyses of patients seen in this setting versus other settings.”

In other terms, sure, fell thousands of dollars to dodge lines, have better access to caregivers, and a more pleasant visit to the doctor. Just don’t expect to live longer or healthier as a result.

But surely the addition of all that data from wearable tech must make it easier for doctors to tell you if you’re healthy, or how to get you there, right? Yeah, about that: “By creating a biometric pattern, the hypothesi is that some things will be picked up that is normally would not, ” says Sandro Galea, dean of the Boston University School of Public Health. “What you’re genuinely doing is screening, and in order to screen you have to ask if you’re ready to intervene.” Which is to say, false positives and false negatives become more of a number of problems with any kind of preemptive, asymptomatic testing.

What people do know about wearable fitness trackers is that they’re not as accurate as one might hope, and that people tend to stop using them. One review article said that Fitbits and Jawbones tended to undercount energy expenditure and overcount sleep, for example. It’s also worth thinking about whether steps-per-day is the right proxy for overall health. A review from earlier this year found that using wearable activity trackers had no statistically significant impact on body mass indicator, weight, waist circumference, body fat percentage, or blood pressure.

Maybe the accuracy of the devices will get better, and perhaps they’ll begin to be a key to individualized, “precision” medicine, as some people hope. Today, right now, sensors and a sophisticated record tying all your data together may not stimulate you, specifically, healthier. But look to your left and look to your right: It might help those people. Which is to say, integrating your entire personal and medical history–your phenotype–with your activity levels and genotype may have value to society, by allowing for a new kind of population-scale science. “Individual prediction is a totally different kettle of fish than the issue of population predictions, ” Galea says. “At the population level, I suppose these data are very interesting.”

So for example, a pharmaceutical company given the opportunity to discern which gene variants were associated with specific health outcomes in late life, or certain demographic groups. Maybe some activity patterns correlate to maladies or health decades later. Who knows?

The trick is to get a lot of that data–from many different kinds of people, in an ethical, procure, private style. Forward doesn’t share data, but you can take it all with you. Seqster has a bunch of layers of permission, and expects that pharmaceutical companies and researchers will eventually come asking to look at people’s( anonymized) data. “We want to generate value for users, and then we will connect users to our partners, ” Arianpour says. “We never sell your data without you being involved.” If you agree to be contacted, if someone wants your you-stuff as part of a research pool or to train a machine-learning network, they ask and you can decide if you consent. There might even be a little something in it for you. “There is likely to be multiple ways of incentivizing the consumers, ” Arianpour tells. “Obviously, financially will be one.”

Of course, optimizing your healthcare for “the worlds largest” good is technically not your problem. If you’re interested in splurging on holistic, Apple-scale healthcare, concierge services like Forward will help you quantify yourself in a soothing environment. You require national-scale systems and standards to figure out the tradeoff between organized, siloed information and messy, aggregated data that has great value, but only if you share it.

Data Deluge

As companies like Verily launch massive health care research studies like Project: Baseline, be mindful of what that data will be used for, and who it will benefit.

There are security and privacy issues around every corner, which is why some companies are already promising answers with buzzwordy technologies like the blockchain.

As more companies and health care providers collect your data, make sure you’re getting the benefits, too.

There’s a search for a fifth meat- and 19 other things podcasts taught us in 2016

Whether its asking what happens when you watch Sexuality and the City 2 more than 50 times or which Oscar has won an Oscar, theres no question a podcast somewhere hasnt answered

1 Richard Ayoade utilized a ThunderCats duvet cover until he was in his late 20 s

Where we learned it The Adam Buxton podcast

Adam Buxtons life-affirming, jingle-packed ramble chats with his celebrity guests are a constant delight. In this two-parter, the multi-talented Ayoade went into everything from the high levels of pillows to the reaction to his notoriously awkward interview with Krishnan Guru-Murthy. As funny as the pod is, you will learn a lot, too from Buxtons honest discussions among sorrow when his dad succumbed to how upsetting Sara Pascoe observes it when people build clicky sticky noises with their mouths.

Other lessons from this podcast Louis Theroux does a fine rendition of Yes Sir, I Can Boogie. Ellie Violet Bramley

Malcolm
Journalist and author Malcolm Gladwell. Photo: Anne Bailey

2 One of the biggest auto recollects in history may have been caused by drivers pressing the wrong pedal

Where we learned it Malcolm Gladwells Revisionist History

If you are familiar with Gladwells run, then Revisionist History is both a treat and familiar territory. The New Yorker novelist often takes assumptions and things we might think to be true and unravels them to end up in a different place wholly. In his bestseller Blink, he explained why it might not have been so unusual that an unarmed man was shot 41 days by New York police. In the best episode of Revisionist History, Gladwell seemed back at Toyotas sudden unintended acceleration phenomenon, which led to a gigantic fine for the car maker. The conclusion after we listen to a 911 call in which a man is driven to his death by a auto that wont slow down was not that the cars accelerators were sticking, but that drivers unfamiliar with certain autoes were having a brain malfunction that meant they were physically unable to differentiate between the brake and the accelerator.

Other lessons from this podcast American colleges with the nicest canteens are the worst options for poor students; if you want to score the most free-throws in basketball, do them underarm. Will Dean

3 One day, everyone in Sweden switched to driving on the opposite side of the road

Where we learned it 99% Invisible

You neednt be an architecture or design fanatic to enjoy Roman Marss gentle unpicking of how the world around us came to look and function as it does. As well as tales about the origins of the inflatable men they have outside auto merchants in the US, and why they used to publicize missing children on milk cartons, you can learn about Hgertrafikomlggningen , or H-day 3 September 1967 when everyone in Sweden switched from driving on the left side of the road to the right.

Other lessons from this podcast Californias Salton Sea was formed by mistake; 20 years ago, the world became obsessed with a phone booth in the middle of the Mojave desert. Leah Harper

4 Having your own podcast wont win you an election

Where we learned it With Her

How do we know that Hillary Clinton enjoyed a Cuban sandwich and a brew at the end of a day on the road? Well, she had her own campaign podcast, about the little details of being on the road. In the first episode, Max Linsky, of the podcast Longform, talked to her in Miami about what she was going to have for dinner that evening. As the first presidential candidate to have a campaign podcast, Clinton tried to harness the power of the medium to presents a more personable side of herself. Suffice to say, it didnthave the desired effect.

Other lessons from this podcast Clinton is a TED talks fan and has to ration her Elena Ferrante fictions. EVB

My
The hosts of My Dad Wrote a Porno.

5 Theres more than one route of motivating your sales force

Where we learned it My Dad Wrote a Porno

Pots-and-pans marketings supremo Belinda Blumenthal can find lust in any situation even when she is lost in an ornamental maze. The superstar of the erotic fiction written by comedian Jamie Mortons father has taught the world that a regional marketings meeting has just as much possibilities for naked fun as a business journey to Amsterdam. Other things she has appropriated into her libidinous realm include a charity tombola, Herb Alpert, a chalet, a pomegranate, a horsebox and any sentence involving the words further access. What she has taught listeners about her ridiculously sexy life is a possibility unsavoury, but via Mortons podcast it has brought a whole lot of mirth.

Other lessons from this podcast There is such a thing as a vaginal eyelid; never read erotic fiction written by your dad. Hannah Verdier

6 Sacha Baron Cohen has been known to use a getaway car

Where we learned it WTF

Marc Marons WTF can be off-putting: the hosts 15 -minute opening monologue and guitar jams are often enough to deter new listeners. But when it comes to teasing out colorful details from the careers of some of Hollywoods funniest and finest, Maron is the master. Grimsby may have bombed in the cinema, but it was worth it for the interview Baron Cohen did with Maron to promote the cinema. The best bits were the detailed logistical difficulties of attaining Brno, from how a redneck battle crowd were duped into watching a homoerotic cavort to how Baron Cohen managed to escape Kansas police after being caught with, among other things, a pedal-powered sex machine in a hotel room.( He had a car waiting outside with the engine running .)

Other lessons from this podcast Asking what peoples parents were like rarely gets a dull answer; if you have the US president over to record in your garage, youd better have nice neighbours; William Friedkin is the best storyteller in Hollywood. WD

Alix
Alix Fox looks into people sexuality lives. Photograph: Ken McKay/ Rex/ Shutterstock

7 Having two vaginas doesnt mean you can have vaginal sex with two men at the same time

Where we learned it Close Encounters from the Guardian

Alix Fox pries into the complicated and fascinating lives of people for whom sex is not always entirely straightforward, from a polyamorous couple to a man paralysed from the waist down just before his honeymoon. An extraordinary interview with double-barrelled Hazel, who talked openly about the effect her condition has had on her and may have on her if she wants to have children is the standout so far.

Other lessons from this podcast Russian-doll-style dildos can cure vaginismus; having cold feet can help to delay an orgasm. LH

8 The search for a fifth meat continues

Where we learned it The Beef and Dairy Network podcast

The centuries-old assumption that there are only four meats beef, lamb, pork and chicken is disintegrating after unconfirmed reports that the European Space Agency has identified a mysterious fifth meat. The Beef and Dairy Network podcast, produced by comedian Ben Partridge, is the No 1 podcast for those involved or only interested in the production of beef animals and dairy herds. Featuring guest appearances from agricultural experts such as Josie Long, and attracting fans including Miranda Sawyer, it is a surreal beefstravaganza.

Other lessons from this podcast According to Beef and Dairy Network sponsor Mitchells, 90% of livestock can kick through a ships hull after merely one month of taking hoof-strengthening supplement Steel Hoof Deluxe. EVB

A
Dont set this cow in your ships hull. Photo: Brian Brown/ Getty Images

9 John Oliver is not dead

Where we learned it The Bugle

For a decade, long-time comedy partners John Oliver and Andy Zaltzman set the world to rights via the medium of their audio newspaper for a visual world. Their riffs on anything from civil liberty( Like puppies, John, we love our own, but we get really riled when other peoples civil liberties maintain shitting on our lawns) to Texas barbecues( All I know is this, Andy: if I was a cow, and I knew that I could savour like that, Id find it very hard to make a coherent example for not being instantly killed and slow-cooked) often attained the indicate the funniest thing you could get on Wi-Fi. With Oliver having left the Daily Show to front his own depict on HBO, the Bugle went into satirical hibernation. It awoke in mid-October, just in time for a political event so ridiculous that even Zaltzman at his most surreal couldnt have imagined it. The pods Have I Got News for You-style rotating guest co-hosts now include US comics Wyatt Cenac and Hari Kondabolu, as well as Brit Nish Kumar and brilliant Indian standup Anuvab Pal. They dont know each other as well as best friends Zaltzman and Oliver, but perhaps the other co-host, Andys sister Helen, could claim an advantage on that front. The Bugle is dead, long live the Bugle.

Other lessons from this podcast Bashar al-Assad bought LMFAOs Im Sexy and I Know It as the Syrian civil war raged. WD

10 A bloke operating a driving school in Acton, west London, was also helping to prop up the death penalty in the US

Where we learned it More Perfect

In a residential area of west London, inside a build with a banner that reads Elgone Driving Academy, is a guy in his 50 s who looks a bit like William Hurt and who was the one-man operation helping to provide the medications used for capital punishment in the US. That was until a human rights charity alerted the UK government to his pharmaceutical broom closet of demise. In the inaugural episode of More Perfect, a Radiolab spin-off looking at how US supreme court cases affect lives miles away from the bench, the presenters investigated those three little terms from the US constitution: cruel and unusual.

Other lessons from this podcast An unusual 911 call made in Houston, Texas, in 1998, led to one of the most important LGBTQ rights decisions in the courts history, effectively inducing homosexual relations a basic civil right. EVB

11 The political insiders word for people panicking about a Trump win was bedwetters

Where we learned it Keepin it 1600

A politics podcast hosted by Barack Obamas former speechwriter and a senior communications consultant ought to holler wonkishness, but Jon Favreau and Dan Pfeiffer may be the two most engaging analysts of a bonkers electoral campaign. Having been at the heart of two US election cyclones, they alongside other hosts Jon Lovett and Tommy Vietor know, inside-out, how this world runs and share it. Their near certainty about a Clinton win up to the morning of the election attained 1600 one of the most reassuring political podcasts you could listen to and build their morning-after mea culpa on 9 November all the more extraordinary. Now its really time to wet the bed.

Other lessons from this podcast The Obama team realised it was impossible to disprove crazy lies about its candidate after Fox News said in 2008 that the young Obama had been raised a Muslim when the team complained, they were told that it was an amusement indicate. WD

12 Billy Joel has really soft hands

Where we learned it Two Dope Queens

Comedians and co-podcast hosts Phoebe Robinson and Jessica Williams went where two black females have never gone before a Billy Joel concert. They sneaked in their ros in suntan lotion bottles bought on Amazon the kind that get white girls, watching the Shins, through Coachella. And, having been given front-row tickets because Billy likes to see pretty girls up at the front, they got to shake his baby-soft hands. If thats not informative enough for you, listen to the other episodes of this snort-out-loud-funny podcast from WNYC and hear some of New Yorks best female comedians talking about sexuality, romance, race, hair journeys and living in the city.

Other lessons from this podcast Pierce Brosnans volcano thriller Dantes Peak has a lot to tell us about how far we have come since the 90 s; talcum powder is the best method to deal with boob sweat. EVB

13 Tar heroin reeks just like capers

Where we learned it Guys We Fucked

Corinne Fisher and Krystyna Hutchinson host the anti-slut-shaming podcast, featuring interviews with everyone from Jon Ronson to Stoya( and, as the title gently suggests, people with whom they have had sex ). Their interview with Wendi Kent or, as they call her, White Precious who photographs protesters outside abortion clinics, exposed the reason she can no longer eat capers and what its like to have sex when youre homeless. But its not all heavy-going. The episode titles alone are a treat good luck concealing You didnt go to France because you wanted to masturbate ?, His pubes were haunted? and Period sex: thoughts? from fellow commuters.

Other lessons from this podcast DIY HIV tests can be done at home( or on-air) with a mouth swab; comedians on the circuit all hook up with each other. LH

Sex
There is such a this as too much SatC2 I entail, you knew that already, right? Photograph: Allstar/ Warner/ Sportsphoto Ltd

14 You can watch Sexuality and the City 2 too many times

Where we learned it The Worst Idea of All Time

A lot of time, endeavour and fund, especially fund, went into making this film, tells Guy Montgomery. Weve just opened up the most disgusting can of worms. Theres no need to watch SatC2 because he and Tim Batt have done it more than 50 hours for the sake of their podcast( they did the same with Grown Ups 2 ). Mirandas nanny Magda is a spy who is gradually poisoning her, Charlotte is the other one and the whole thing is weeping out for the kind of dialogue that stimulated the TV series great.

Other lessons from this podcast We Are Your Friends is next on your hatewatch listing. HV

15 You can have a podcast about a podcast

Where we learned it Slates Serial Spoiler Specials

Slates week-by-week analysis of Serial, 2014 s podcast obsession, is perfect for when everyone you know is listening far too slowly offering narrative recaps, whodunnit theories and criticisms of the host, Sarah Koenig. Not to mention excavating deep down into Reddit rabbit holes about the two cases covered in so far.

Other lessons from this podcast The cow birth in season two can be seen as an agricultural metaphor for the militarys response to Bowe Bergdahls disappearance; its almost impossible to map a timeline via audio. LH

16 Moby is a CD thief

Where we learned it Heavyweight

Jonathan Goldsteins Heavyweight aims to the tell the stories of people whose lives have taken a incorrect turn somewhere. One of these was to reunited his 80 -year-old father with his elder brother before it was too late. Another was to reunite his friend Gregor who is haunted by the moment he loaned a box of Cds to a techno-producer friend. The friend, was, of course, Moby, who employed many of them as the basis for his squillion-selling Play. Gregor doesnt want royalties he just wants his CDs back. And Goldstein helps him get them.

Other lessons from this podcast Tracking down your school bullies is an uncomfortable eye-opener( as demonstrated by Julia in episode seven ). HV

17 You can have an -Alist cast in a podcast drama

Where we learned it Homecoming

Although Serial was essentially a piece of investigative journalism, its format proved that podcasting didnt need to be limited in its form. Gimlet Media, a specialist podcasting company, emerged around the same day as that NPR hit and proved its ambitions in the field. Its scripted drama, Homecoming, aimed straight for the stars with a cast including Catherine Keener, Star Wars Oscar Isaac and David Schwimmer. The story flips between Keeners characters work at an experimental facility that helps soldiers incorporate back in local communities and her present-day life as a waitress. There are plenty of cliffhangers helping to tell the story of what happened in between.

Other lessons from this podcast You dont mess with David Schwimmer. As Colin Belfast, he oozes fury and has the air of a human on the leading edge. HV

18, 19, 20 France buys in most of its frogs legs only one person called Oscar has won an Oscar Donald, Huey, Dewey and Louie Duck are the most reprinted comic book characters( that arent superheroes) of all time

Where we learned it Answer Me This !

Helen Zaltzman and Olly Mann( plus Martin the soundman) solve listeners queries on a fortnightly basis with questions ranging from the practical to the ethical to the ridiculous. Suffice to say, you are able to learn more listening to them while doing the washing up than from Heart FM. You will also learn that drunken voicemails are greet, especially from Dave from Smethwick and Graham from Canada.( Its Oscar Hammerstein II, by the way .) LH

The Guardian publishes a wide range of award-winning podcasts daily, from Football Weekly to the Guardian Books podcast, all of which are available on our site , iTunes and other leading podcast platforms .

Read more: www.theguardian.com

There’s a search for a fifth meat- and 19 other things podcasts taught us in 2016

Whether its asking what happens when you watch Sexuality and the City 2 more than 50 periods or which Oscar has won an Oscar, theres no question a podcast somewhere hasnt answered

1 Richard Ayoade utilized a ThunderCats duvet cover until he was in his late 20 s

Where we learned it The Adam Buxton podcast

Adam Buxtons life-affirming, jingle-packed ramble chats with his celebrity guests are a constant delight. In this two-parter, the multi-talented Ayoade went into everything from the height of pillows to the reaction to his notoriously awkward interview with Krishnan Guru-Murthy. As funny as the pod is, you are able to learn a lot, too from Buxtons honest discussions of sorrow when his dad died to how upsetting Sara Pascoe finds it when people make clicky sticky noises with their mouths.

Other lessons from this podcast Louis Theroux does a fine rendition of Yes Sir, I Can Boogie. Ellie Violet Bramley

Malcolm
Journalist and author Malcolm Gladwell. Photo: Anne Bailey

2 One of the biggest auto remembers in history may have been caused by drivers pressing the incorrect pedal

Where we learned it Malcolm Gladwells Revisionist History

If you are familiar with Gladwells work, then Revisionist History is both a treat and familiar territory. The New Yorker novelist often takes assumptions and things we might think to be true and unravels them to end up in a different place altogether. In his bestseller Blink, he explained why it might not have been so unusual that an unarmed man was shot 41 periods by New York police. In the best episode of Revisionist History, Gladwell seemed back at Toyotas sudden unintended acceleration phenomenon, which led to a gigantic fine for the car manufacturer. The conclusion after we listen to a 911 call in which a man is driven to his death by a car that wont slow down was not that the cars accelerators were sticking, but that drivers unfamiliar with certain vehicles were having a brain malfunction that entailed they were physically unable to differentiate between the brake and the accelerator.

Other lessons from this podcast American colleges with the nicest canteens are the worst choices for poor students; if you want to score the most free-throws in basketball, do them underarm. Will Dean

3 One day, everyone in Sweden switched to driving on the opposite side of the road

Where we learned it 99% Invisible

You neednt be an architecture or design fanatic to enjoy Roman Marss gentle unpicking of how the world around us came to look and function as it does. As well as stories about the origins of the inflatable humen they have outside vehicle dealers in the US, and why they used to publicize missing children on milk cartons, you can learn about Hgertrafikomlggningen , or H-day 3 September 1967 when everyone in Sweden switched from driving on the left side of the road to the right.

Other lessons from this podcast Californias Salton Sea was formed by mistake; 20 years ago, the world became obsessed with a phone booth in the middle of the Mojave desert. Leah Harper

4 Having your own podcast wont win you an election

Where we learned it With Her

How do we know that Hillary Clinton enjoyed a Cuban sandwich and a beer at the end of a day on the road? Well, she had her own campaign podcast, about the little details of being on the trail. In the first episode, Max Linsky, of the podcast Longform, talked to her in Miami about what she was going to have for dinner that evening. As the first presidential nominee to have a campaign podcast, Clinton tried to harness the power of the medium to presents a more personable side of herself. Suffice to say, it didnthave the desired effect.

Other lessons from this podcast Clinton is a TED talks fan and has to ration her Elena Ferrante novels. EVB

My
The hosts of My Dad Wrote a Porno.

5 Theres more than one style of motivating your marketings force

Where we learned it My Dad Wrote a Porno

Pots-and-pans marketings supremo Belinda Blumenthal can find lust in any situation even when she is lost in an ornamental maze. The starring of the erotic fiction written by comedian Jamie Mortons father has taught the world that a regional sales meeting has just as much potential for naked fun as a business trip-up to Amsterdam. Other things she has appropriated into her libidinous realm include a charity tombola, Herb Alpert, a chalet, a pomegranate, a horsebox and any sentence involving the words further access. What she has taught listeners about her ridiculously sexy life is a possibility unsavoury, but via Mortons podcast it has brought a whole lot of mirth.

Other lessons from this podcast There is such a thing as a vaginal lid; never read erotic fiction written by your daddy. Hannah Verdier

6 Sacha Baron Cohen has been known to use a getaway car

Where we learned it WTF

Marc Marons WTF can be off-putting: the hosts 15 -minute opening monologue and guitar jams are often enough to deter new listeners. But when it comes to teasing out colorful details from the careers of some of Hollywoods funniest and finest, Maron is the master. Grimsby may have bombed in the cinemas, but it was worth it for the interview Baron Cohen did with Maron to promote the cinema. The best bits were the details of the logistical difficulties of making Brno, from how a redneck fight crowd were deceived into watching a homoerotic romp to how Baron Cohen managed to escape Kansas police after being caught with, among other things, a pedal-powered sexuality machine in a hotel room.( He had a automobile waiting outside with the engine running .)

Other lessons from this podcast Asking what peoples parents were like rarely gets a dull answer; if you have the US president over to record in your garage, youd better have nice neighbours; William Friedkin is the best storyteller in Hollywood. WD

Alix
Alix Fox looks into people sex lives. Photo: Ken McKay/ Rex/ Shutterstock

7 Having two vaginas doesnt mean you can have vaginal sexuality with two men at the same time

Where we learned it Close Encounters from the Guardian

Alix Fox pries into the complicated and fascinating lives of people for whom sex is not always entirely straightforward, from a polyamorous couple to a man paralysed from the waist down just before his honeymoon. An extraordinary interview with double-barrelled Hazel, who talked openly about the effect her condition has had on her and may have on her if she wants to have infants is the standout so far.

Other lessons from this podcast Russian-doll-style dildos can cure vaginismus; having cold feet can help to delay an orgasm. LH

8 The search for a fifth meat continues

Where we learned it The Beef and Dairy Network podcast

The centuries-old assumption that there are only four meats beef, lamb, pork and chicken is crumbling after unconfirmed reports that the European Space Agency has identified a mysterious fifth meat. The Beef and Dairy Network podcast, produced by comedian Ben Partridge, is the No 1 podcast for those involved or simply interested in the production of beef animals and dairy herds. Featuring guest appearances from agricultural experts such as Josie Long, and attracting fans including Miranda Sawyer, it is a surreal beefstravaganza.

Other lessons from this podcast According to Beef and Dairy Network sponsor Mitchells, 90% of livestock can kick through a ships hull after just one month of taking hoof-strengthening supplement Steel Hoof Deluxe. EVB

A
Dont put this cow in your ships hull. Photo: Brian Brown/ Getty Images

9 John Oliver is not dead

Where we learned it The Bugle

For a decade, long-time comedy partners John Oliver and Andy Zaltzman set the world to rights via the medium of their audio newspaper for a visual world. Their riffs on anything from civil liberty( Like dogs, John, we love our own, but we get actually vexed when other people civil liberties keep shitting on our lawns) to Texas barbecues( All I know is this, Andy: if I was a cow, and I knew that I could savour like that, Id find it very hard to make a coherent example for not being instantly killed and slow-cooked) often attained the prove the funniest thing you could get on Wi-Fi. With Oliver having left the Daily Show to front his own display on HBO, the Bugle went into satirical hibernation. It awoke in mid-October, just in time for a political event so ridiculous that even Zaltzman at his most surreal couldnt have imagined it. The pods Have I Got News for You-style rotating guest co-hosts now include US comics Wyatt Cenac and Hari Kondabolu, as well as Brit Nish Kumar and brilliant Indian standup Anuvab Pal. They dont know each other as well as best friends Zaltzman and Oliver, but perhaps the other co-host, Andys sister Helen, could claim an advantage on that front. The Bugle is dead, long live the Bugle.

Other lessons from this podcast Bashar al-Assad bought LMFAOs Im Sexy and I Know It as the Syrian civil war raged. WD

10 A bloke operating a driving school in Acton, west London, was also helping to prop up the capital punishment in the US

Where we learned it More Perfect

In a residential area of west London, inside a build with a banner that reads Elgone Driving Academy, is a guy in his 50 s who looks a bit like William Hurt and who was the one-man operation helping to provide the medications used for capital punishment in the US. That was until a human rights charity alerted the UK government to his pharmaceutical broom closet of demise. In the inaugural episode of More Perfect, a Radiolab spin-off looking at how US supreme court cases affect lives miles away from the bench, the presenters investigated those three little words from the US constitution: cruel and unusual.

Other lessons from this podcast An unusual 911 call made in Houston, Texas, in 1998, led to one of the most important point LGBTQ rights decisions in the courts history, effectively stimulating homosexual relations a basic civil right. EVB

11 The political insiders word for people panicking about a Trump win was bedwetters

Where we learned it Keepin it 1600

A politics podcast hosted by Barack Obamas former speechwriter and a senior communications consultant ought to scream wonkishness, but Jon Favreau and Dan Pfeiffer may be the two most engaging analysts of a bonkers election campaign. Having been at the heart of two US election blizzards, they alongside other hosts Jon Lovett and Tommy Vietor know, inside-out, how this world works and share it. Their near certainty about a Clinton win up to the morning of the election induced 1600 one of the most reassuring political podcasts you could listen to and induce their morning-after mea culpa on 9 November all the more extraordinary. Now its truly time to wet the bed.

Other lessons from this podcast The Obama team realised it was impossible to disprove crazy lies about its candidate after Fox News said in 2008 that the young Obama had been raised a Muslim when the team complained, they were told that it was an entertainment show. WD

12 Billy Joel has really soft hands

Where we learned it Two Dope Queens

Comedians and co-podcast hosts Phoebe Robinson and Jessica Williams went where two black women have never gone before a Billy Joel concert. They sneaked in their ros in suntan lotion bottles bought on Amazon the kind that get white girls, watching the Shins, through Coachella. And, having been given front-row tickets because Billy likes to see fairly women up at the front, they got to shake his baby-soft hands. If thats not informative enough for you, listen to the other episodes of this snort-out-loud-funny podcast from WNYC and hear some of New Yorks best female comedians talking about sex, romance, race, hair journeys and living in the city.

Other lessons from this podcast Pierce Brosnans volcano thriller Dantes Peak has a lot to tell us about how far we have come since the 90 s; talcum powder is the best method to deal with boob sweat. EVB

13 Tar heroin reeks just like capers

Where we learned it Guys We Fucked

Corinne Fisher and Krystyna Hutchinson host the anti-slut-shaming podcast, featuring interviews with everyone from Jon Ronson to Stoya( and, as the title gently suggests, people with whom they have had sexuality ). Their interview with Wendi Kent or, as they call her, White Precious who photographs protesters outside abortion clinics, uncovered the reason she can no longer feed capers and what its like to have sex when youre homeless. But its not all heavy-going. The episode titles alone are a treat good luck concealing You didnt go to France because you wanted to masturbate ?, His pubes were haunted? and Period sex: thoughts? from fellow commuters.

Other lessons from this podcast DIY HIV tests can be done at home( or on-air) with a mouth swab; comedians on the circuit all hook up with each other. LH

Sex
There is such a this as too much SatC2 I entail, you knew that already, right? Photograph: Allstar/ Warner/ Sportsphoto Ltd

14 You can watch Sexuality and the City 2 too many times

Where we learned it The Worst Idea of All Time

A lot of time, effort and fund, especially money, went into making this film, says Guy Montgomery. Weve just opened up the most disgusting can of worms. Theres no need to watch SatC2 because he and Tim Batt have done it more than 50 hours for the sake of their podcast( they did the same with Grown Ups 2 ). Mirandas nanny Magda is a spy who is gradually poisoning her, Charlotte is the other one and the whole thing is screaming out for the kind of dialogue that induced the Tv series great.

Other lessons from this podcast We Are Your Friends is next on your hatewatch listing. HV

15 You can have a podcast about a podcast

Where we learned it Slates Serial Spoiler Specials

Slates week-by-week analysis of Serial, 2014 s podcast obsession, is perfect for when everyone else you know is listening far too slowly offering tale recaps, whodunnit hypothesis and critiques of the host, Sarah Koenig. Not to mention digging deep down into Reddit rabbit holes about the two cases covered so far.

Other lessons from this podcast The cow birth in season two can be seen as an agricultural metaphor for the militarys response to Bowe Bergdahls disappearance; its almost impossible to map a timeline via audio. LH

16 Moby is a CD thief

Where we learned it Heavyweight

Jonathan Goldsteins Heavyweight aims to the tell the stories of people whose lives have taken a wrong turn somewhere. One of these was to reunite his 80 -year-old father with his elder friend before it was too late. Another was to reunite his friend Gregor who is haunted by the moment he loaned a box of Cds to a techno-producer friend. The friend, was, of course, Moby, who employed many of them as the basis for his squillion-selling Play. Gregor doesnt want royalties he just wants his Cds back. And Goldstein helps him get them.

Other lessons from this podcast Tracking down your school bullies is an uncomfortable eye-opener( as demonstrated by Julia in episode seven ). HV

17 You can have an -Alist cast in a podcast drama

Where we learned it Homecoming

Although Serial was essentially a piece of investigative journalism, its format proved that podcasting didnt need to be limited in its form. Gimlet Media, functional specialists podcasting company, emerged around the same time as that NPR made and proved its aspirations in the field. Its scripted drama, Homecoming, aimed straight for the stars with a casting including Catherine Keener, Star Wars Oscar Isaac and David Schwimmer. The narrative flips between Keeners characters work at an experimental facility that helps soldiers incorporate back into the community and her present-day life as a waitress. There are plenty of cliffhangers helping to tell the story of what happened in between.

Other lessons from this podcast You dont mess with David Schwimmer. As Colin Belfast, he oozes rage and has the air of a human on the leading edge. HV

18, 19, 20 France buys in most of its frogs legs only one person called Oscar has won an Oscar Donald, Huey, Dewey and Louie Duck are the most reprinted comic book characters( that arent superheroes) of all time

Where we learned it Answer Me This !

Helen Zaltzman and Olly Mann( plus Martin the soundman) solve listeners queries on a fortnightly basis with questions ranging from the practical to the ethical to the ridiculous. Suffice to say, you are able to learnt more listening to them while doing the washing up than from Heart FM. You will also learn that drunken voicemails are greet, especially from Dave from Smethwick and Graham from Canada.( Its Oscar Hammerstein II, by the way .) LH

The Guardian publishes a wide range of award-winning podcasts daily, from Football Weekly to the Guardian Books podcast, all of which are available on our site , iTunes and other resulting podcast platforms .

Read more: www.theguardian.com