Madonna creates $7.5 m for Malawi and criticises Trump at Miami show

Singer tells plight of Native Americans induces her ashamed to be an American at benefit performance and auction

Madonna has repeatedly criticised Donald Trump and said she is ashamed to be an American, in a performance and auction in Miami that raised more than $7.5 m( 5.9 m) for her Malawi foundation.

Images of the president-elect appeared behind her as she sang the line You know that youre toxic from her cover of the Britney Spears hit.

The singer also revealed she had once been in Trumps bed for a publication photoshoot when the tycoon was not at home. She took a shot at his cheap sheets, saying: They wont be Egyptian cotton because we all know how he feels about Muslims, dont we?

Madonna covers Toxic

Madonna also spoke about the plight of Native Americans and asked why their land was being destroyed. It just really attains me feel ashamed ashamed to be an American, ashamed to be a human being, truly, she said before performing her 2003 hit American Life.

The benefit show, billed as an evening of music, art and mischief, insured Madonna resuscitate her cabaret indicate, Tears of a Clown, first performed in Australia earlier this year.

It was one of the many parties held during Art Basel Miami Beach, the biggest art fair in Northern america, which attracts super-rich art collectors and celebrities from across the world. Guests, who paid at least $5,000 to attend, included Leonardo DiCaprio, Chris Rock, Dave Chappelle, former boyfriend Alex Rodriguez, Courtney Love and James Corden.

Before her hour-long performance, Madonna auctioned pieces from her personal art collecting, including a Tracey Emin print that sold for $550,000 and three Herb Ritts photographs from her 1985 wedding to Sean Penn that fetched $230,000.

Other lots included a Damien Hirst painting, a private performance by the magician David Blaine, who also attended, and a week-long stay at DiCaprios home in Palm Springs that ran for $140,000.

Penn bid on several items when the auction stalled. At one point, Madonna strolled into the audience, climbed on tables and devoted one man a lap dance. She abruptly stood up at another point, grabbed the chair on which she had performed and said she also wanted to auction it , noting $600 could send a girl in Malawi to secondary school. The chair sold for $10,000.

Madonna adopted her 11 -year-old son, David, from an orphanage in Malawi more than ten years ago. At the time, she said she didnt know where Malawi was. David had pneumonia and malaria. His mom died in childbirth and his siblings were also dead.

He was at the event to introduces the vocalist, telling the audience: I realise Im one of the luck ones.

Madonna presented videos of Malawi, asking for help to build a paediatric surgery and intensive care unit at a hospital there. Half the population are under the age of 15, according to her foundation, Raising Malawi.

As well as political statements and corny buffoon jokes, Madonna lamented the fact she was very single and had not had sex for some time.

The Associated Press contributed to this report .

Read more: www.theguardian.com

Danny Fields: the coolest guy you’ve never heard of- up to now

He managed the Ramones, helped launch the Door, and hung around with Warhol. A new documentary sets the man behind the scenes front stage

In his diary, Andy Warhol wrote that he would love to cinema Danny Fields life story. The artist succumbed six weeks later, but now Fieldss life has finally arrived the screen in a new documentary called, Danny Says .

You may not have heard of Danny Fields, but you definitely know his friends. As well as hanging out with Warhol, Fields helped launch the Door into superstardom, palled around with Nico, Edie Sedgwick, and Alice Cooper; was the first person to play the Ramones to Lou Reed; was friends with Linda McCartney despite helping aim the Beatles touring career; introduced Iggy Pop to David Bowie, and was immortalized in the Ramones tune Danny Says.

For decades, Fields has operated behind the scenes of the music world, forging connections and making stars. If it werent for Danny the world might not have ever heard the Stooges and the Ramones, and we definitely wouldnt have just heard Nico as a solo artist, said Gillian McCain, co-author of the definitive punk oral history, Please Kill Me, a volume dedicated to Fields as eternally the coolest guy in the room.

As the self-described label freak at Elektra Records, Fields was almost single-handedly responsible for ushering in the punk epoch in the US. He managed the Ramoness early career, and get both the Stooges and the MC5 signed to his label. Despite these impressive credentials, Fieldss name is scarcely known outside the music business. That might all change thanks to the new documentary, which premiered at SXSW last year and is now open in select theaters and available online.

The film was directed against Brendan Toller, who worked on the cinema for almost seven years, finishing it mere weeks before it was slated to premiere. He first came across the legend of Fields in the books Please Kill Me and Edie( Jean Steins book about Sedgwick, the Warhol muse ), but he had a hard time sorting out the fact from the hyperbole. Danny Fields at Harvard stealing crystal with Edie Sedgwick couldnt perhaps be the same guy being the publicist for the Door or managing the Ramones, tells Toller. Turns out, though, when it comes to Fields all the rumors are true, which Toller illustrates in the film.

The documentary pieces together interviews with Fields and many of his friends including Pop, Cooper, Tommy Ramone, Jonathan Richman, legendary record boss Seymour Stein, Ramones logo designer Arturo Vega, folk singer Judy Collins, MC5s Wayne Kramer and many more, all interwoven with archival footage, audio recordings, and animation that blends together to help tell the story of this musical influencer.

Fields dedicated Toller access to his personal archives and Toller expended months “re going through” the files, telephone recordings, cassette videotapes, ephemera, and photographs that Fields had collected over his long career. Professionally, Fields played a variety of roles in the music industry he was a journalist, editor of 16 magazine and Datebook. When the latter publication published John Lennons quote about the Beatles being bigger than Jesus( from an interview which had passed without comment in London Evening Standard a few months before ), it caused outrage throughout America, the pressure virtually broken off the band and spelling the end of their touring career. Fields also dedicated bands like the Velvet Underground and the Who some of their earliest press.

He also worked as a publicist, director, DJ, A& R rep and a photographer who documented the scene he was helping make. He was a noted provocateur who loved swapping bon mots. When I think about Danny, I think of sitting and chuckling with him, says Lenny Kaye, novelist and longtime member of the Patti Smith Band. He liked to cause a little difficulty. Hes a little mischievous.

There are so many Danny tales, many not fit to print, tells Justin Vivian Bond, the longtime downtown fixture and star of Kiki& Herb, demonstrating the point with an anecdote sadly unsuitable for a family website.

Fields Fields at the re-presentation of Joey Ramones Rock& Roll Hall of Fame induction award in 2009. Photograph: Joe Kohen/ WireImage.com

Whatever his role, Fieldss over-arching objective was to bring people together. That was one of Dannys things, says Kaye. He was a matchmaker, whether it was bringing a band to a record label or putting creative people in the same room and the majority of members of the time that room was Maxs Kansas Citys back room.

Dannys a connector, hes a ga line, a place where things are liable to erupt, tells Iggy Pop in the documentary. I imagine that Dannys legacy, aside from the brilliant route hes chosen to live their own lives, is how he has enhanced the well-being of others by being a connector.

Ive met so many brilliant and astonishing people through Danny, adds Bond. I like to think that through these threads and connectivities we have all become better people, artists and contributors to the ongoing dialogue. Hopefully these threads will continue to raise human consciousness through arts and notions long after were gone.

The film features an incredible cast of characters, which is no real astound when looking back at Fieldss circle of friends. Dannys defined are really the people that generated the world “were living in” today, tells Toller. At least all the good stuff of art, music, and film. These were the revolutionaries of the 60 s and 70 s that brought about what we know as alternative culture.

While the documentary appears back at Fieldss career and has the feeling of a retrospective to it, according to McCain, who got to know Fields while working on Please Kill Me, Fields is not especially the reflective form. He always appears ahead and doesnt dwell on the past, says McCain. Dannys attitude is the best is yet to come.

Danny Tells is in theaters now and is available bothon demandand on iTunes

Desiigner: is the hyped rapper the genre’s new hope or a shameless hack?

Hes signed to Kanyes label, divided opinion at the BET awardings and been accused of ripping off Future but is there more to him than satisfies the eye?

Last year, Brooklyn rapper Desiigner crashed into the spotlight with Panda, a catchy trap track that likens a white BMW X6 to the endangered mammal. Within months of the track surfacing, the 19 -year-old rapper was signed to GOOD Music by the labels newly appointed president, Pusha T, and the signing was announced soon after by label boss Kanye West at his Yeezy Season 3 event. Wests album cut Pt 2 featured a rather prominent sample of Panda, which was criticized as a blatant bite of Atlanta rapper Future, who rendered two number 1 albums last year: Dirty Sprite 2 and What A Time To Be Alive with Drake. The comparing isnt without its flaws, but it has far more merit than Action Bronsons resemblance to Ghostface Killah or when some rap fans believed Your Old Droog to secretly be Nas. You dont have to listen too hard to hear Panda as Future cosplay.

Panda is clearly influenced by Futures highly influential running, a stretching among the most prolific in rap history. It attempts to synthesize the most basic elements of Future makes into a serviceable rapper-suit: the auto-tune coated croakings, the hammering nature of some of his most fearsome cadences( Same Damn Time, and Sh! t, for example ), and his chant-like recitations( Racks and Jumpman ). Even the lyrics to Panda read like a generator spitting out garbled content from Future ballads( I get broads in Atlanta/ Twistin dope, lean, and the Fanta isnt much of a stretching from Im rolling strong weed inside the Phantom/ Im just a street nigga from Atlanta/ We set the codeine inside a Fanta from Futures Jordan Diddy ). The sung and Desiigner have received the ire of the #FutureHive and raised eyebrows from even casual commentators. He isnt the first rapper( or musician) to mold himself in the likeness of a popular superstar, but he are you all right might be the laziest.

In the weeks that followed the Future revelation, Panda climbed to number one on the Billboard Hot 100 charts, getting a folksy pop cover, and eventually running platinum in several countries. Its been a bigger made than any ballad of Futures. But whats been most astonishing about this run is watching a ballad this boring become so trendy, and find Desiigner double down by releasing a full mixtape of Panda variations.

Desiigners story is an interesting one. The rapper turned a beat he purchased online for $200 originally labeled in its YouTube description a Meek Mill-Ace Hood Type Beat into a cosign from the worlds most popular rap superstar. If he isnt playing Future, then hes playing someone else. As MTV News critic Meaghan Garvey points out, his sound is heavily indebted to Chicagos drill scene, mimicking tumbling cadences from rappers like G Herbo( FKA Lil Herb) and Lil Bibby. Its a little bit like watching one of those Michael Jordan-Kobe Bryant mirror-image highlight reels( merely instead of Kobe, its Nick Young ). Hes committed to the role.

The few samples of his early music remaining on the web are vignettes of other rap starrings: Desiigner fashioning himself shadow puppets in the likenesses of Kid Cudi, Travis Scott or Kevin Gates. His recently released debut mixtape, New English( a fitting title for a rapper who has mostly produced indecipherable verses ), scans as parody that turns on the sonic prospers of Chief Keef( Da Day ), Waka Flocka Flame( Monstas& Villains) and, of course, Future( Roll Wit Me, Caliber ).

Desiigner
Desiigner Whats been most astounding about this run is watching a song this boring become so trendy. Photo: PR Image

If Desiigner isnt blatantly rending off the styles of others, then at the least hes a master troll. He continues to dance around the Future comparison in interviews, never outright denying the accusation. And when skeptics first starting saying Panda was a knock off of the Atlanta rapper, Desiigner responded by pestering a follow-up sung called Pluto, the name of Futures debut album. The trolling has continued as recently as this week, when he performed Futures part in DJ Khaleds new single I Got The Keys. Its the closest hell get to being Future.

The best anthem of Desiigners career thus far isnt even a song; its an a cappella freestyle for his XXL Freshman class selection, a rap hymnal called Timmy Turner that has already inspired countless remixes. The tune commands more feeling in 46 seconds than New English does in 36 minutes. Or, at the least, it did, until legendary producer Mike Dean pestered the official version, which turns what was an impassioned performance into merely another one of his soulless imitations. Desiigner is most interesting playing himself, but hes most comfortable playing someone else.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

Avicii: chart-topping EDM star succumbs at 28

The producer and DJ, real name Tim Bergling, was found dead in Oman

Swedish DJ Avicii has died in Muscat, Oman, at the age of 28.

His representative said in a statement:” It is with profound sorrow that we announce the loss of Tim Bergling, also known as Avicii. He was found dead in Muscat, Oman, this Friday afternoon local hour, 20 April.

” The family is devastated and we ask everyone to please respect their need for privacy in this difficult time. No farther statements will be given .”

DJ Calvin Harris tweeted:” Devastating news about Avicii, a beautiful spirit, passionate and exceedingly talented with so much more to do. My heart goes out to his family. God bless you Tim x .”

In an Instagram post, Diplo called him” a real groundbreaker and influencer to all your peers” while Deadmau5 tweeted:” nobody can deny what he has accomplished and done for modern dance music and im very proud of him .”

In 2016, Avicii retired from live performing due to health reasons, having suffered from acute pancreatitis owed, in part, to excessive drinking. In 2014, his gallbladder and appendix had been removed.

Avicii
Avicii performs at the Summerburst music festival at Ullevi stadium in Gothenburg, Sweden. Photo: Bjorn Larsson Rosvall/ AFP/ Getty Images

A documentary about the DJ’s career, Avicii: True Tales, was released last autumn, chronicling his final world tour and his health battles. It features peers such as the DJs Tiesto and David Guetta, as well as musicians Chris Martin and Nile Rodgers.” Everybody knows Avicii but very few people know Tim ,” said director Levan Tsikurishvili.” I think this documentary really presents Tim’s struggle and strength of character .”

Avicii last released new music in 2017, with his six-track EP Avici( 01 ). The album was nominated for a Billboard music award in the category of top dancing/ electronic album. In his most recent tweet, sent out on 17 April, Avicii thanked Billboard for the nomination.

He was best known for reached songs Wake Me Up and Levels, both of which reached No 1 on the Billboard list of top dance club ballads. Twice-nominated for a Grammy award for best dance recording, Avicii’s debut album True, released in 2013, madethe top 10 in ten different countries.

The DJ, who was born in Stockholm, was regularly ranked in the top five of Forbes’ listing of highest-paid DJs before his retirement. In 2012, he became the first electronic musician to headline New York’s esteemed Radio City Music Hall.

In a 2017 interview with Rolling Stone, Avicii reflected on his decision to stop touring, explaining how multiple hospitalizations and life on the road began to take their toll.” None of us today can fucking handle our emotions- the majority of members of us are running around being reactive ,” he told.

” That’s why I had to stop touring, because I couldn’t read my feelings the right way. The whole thing was about success to the purposes of success. I wasn’t getting any happiness anymore .”

Read more: www.theguardian.com

Herb Alpert:’ If someone required my father’s help, he was always there for them’

The trumpeter talks about growing up in a musical family, why his first marriage went wrong, and being a grandfather

I grew up in central Los Angeles . My father was born in Russia. He was a survivor. He had come to the US in 1915, when he was 16 , not speaking a word of English, on his own, at the insistence of his family. He landed in Ellis Island and made a life for himself. My mom was from the Lower East Side of New York. She was a secretary, she was good with numbers and played the violin, but not professionally. One of my earliest memories is from when I was eight . In school, in a music appreciation class, there was a table filled with instruments and I happened to pick up a cornet. It had a profound effect on my life. At home, Id be playing it, and the neighbours would scream, Shut the window! while my mother hollered back at them. My friend played drums; “were in” a musical family. My parent could play the mandolin, although he didnt read music. As my fathers fortunes improved , he brought the rest of his family from Russia to live near us. My grandfather stayed there. I recollect my paternal grandmother, but she only spoke Yiddish so communication is a point. My mom wasnt close to her own parents so we didnt see much of them. I had an elder brother, David, who was five years my senior. We used to play outside or in the street, but I was super-shy and followed him around, but he wasnt so interested in hanging out with me. I guess “were in” middle class . My dad earned a reasonable living manufacturing womens suits and attire as a business; we didnt struggle and had a vacation now and then.

I didnt have a strong notion about what career I wanted. I knew I liked playing the trumpet. My brother and I played together at parties and events. At high school, I was in a little group, with piano, bass, drums and trumpet. We entered a TV talent contest that pitted groups from local high school against each other. Even though few people had TV sets in the 1950 s, we won the show for eight consecutive weeks and that made us a name, so we got gigs around the city on the back of that.

I got married when I was 21. At the time, Id been drafted and was playing with the Sixth Army band in San Franciscos Presidio. I was also working part-time in a gym, and tried my hand at acting for a while, but that didnt work out. I was too young to get married, as evidenced by my getting divorced. I probably didnt understand what was expected of me at that age. Then I got famous and started touring the world, so I wasnt around much.

When I got married the second time, I felt very lucky. Lani is my dream girl. We have been married for 42 years now and had a child together.

Im not sure what my parents taught me . My father didnt articulate much, but led by example. He was generous to his family and very open-hearted. If someone required his help, he was always right there for them, and I saw how people responded to his generosity. Im now a grandpa a few times over . My youngest is two-and-a-half years old. I love the experience and we ensure family as much as we can. They are scattered across the country, but we have Skype so that helps us remain connected. Family is the part of my life that gives me convenience . I am very aware of, and sensitive to, my familys needs and Ill always be there for them, but family is not something I entirely live for. You get one chance to do your thing in this life and I am doing my thing. My ingenuity drives me I dont have any control over it. I know I have made a lot of people happy with my music, and that gives me an enormous energy and pleasure.

Herb Alperts new album, Human nature, is out now, along with 24 of his albums remastered: herbalpert.com

Read more: www.theguardian.com

The 50 Best Running Songs

A good playlist can make all the difference when it comes to running.

Research has demonstrated that listening to some rockin’ beats can stimulate you enjoy your workout more and might even boost your performance. Total win-win.

Spotify recently released a playlist of its top running anthems of 2015, pulling data regarding their go feature and user-created playlists titled with variations of the word “running” to determine which songs were most streamed by runners in 2015.

The result? Delightful jams like TLC’s “No Scrubs, ” which came in at number eight. What seems most apparent from scanning the list is that girls operated the world: Eight of the top 10 anthems are sung by female vocalists. Anyone who runs to Beyonce can understand the power. There’s no scientific evidence that running to the powerful chords of women improves your workout, but sometimes running is believing.

If you’ve been feeling down on your workout music selection lately, these 50 anthems should be only the trick and revitalize your running swag. Subscribe to the playlist below and expect to PR on your next race 😛 TAGEND

Related on HuffPost 😛 TAGEND

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Elton John cancels Las Vegas presents with ‘potentially deadly’ infection

The singer announced he was pulling out of several reveals after contracting a bacterial infection in South America that led to two nights in intensive care

Sir Elton John has pulled out of a series of concerts in Las Vegas due to an unusual bacterial infection he contracted in South America, which left him in intensive care.

The singer announced he was pulling out of the presents on Monday in a statement that explained that he spent two nights in intensive care and was released on 22 April after becoming ailment on a flight to the UK from Chile.

During a recent, successful tour of South America, Elton contracted a harmful and unusual bacterial infection, the statement read.

During his return flight home from Santiago, Chile he became violently ill. Upon returning to the UK, Eltons doctors admitted him to hospital, where he underwent immediate therapy to remove the infection. After spending two nights in intensive care followed by an extended stay in hospital, Elton was released from hospital.

It added that the infection was rare and potentially deadly but that the stars medical team identified it quickly and that he is expected to make a full and complete recovery.

Elton John also added: I am so fortunate to have the most incredible and loyal fans and apologise for disappointing them. I am extremely grateful to the medical team for their excellence in looking after me so well.

The affected indicates were part of the Million Dollar Piano show and were due to take place at Caesars Palace in April and May, while another gig in Bakersfield, California, on 6 May was also cancelled.

The singer is expected to return for his scheduled gig at Twickenham, in London, on 3 June.

Read more: www.theguardian.com

Never mind the bus pass: punks look back at their wildest days

What happens when you go from bassist to banker and punk rocker to priest?

Ausaf Abbas, 55

Then: bass player, Alien Kulture

Now: investment banker

We very much believed in the philosophy of punk heres a chord, heres a second, heres a third , now go and form a band. Id never touched a bass guitar until our first rehearsal, but that didnt matter. It was all about the energy and the enthusiasm.

We are likely to be from the more intellectual wing of punk and were very much involved in the Rock Against Racism campaign. Our name came from Margaret Thatcher, whod made an infamous commentary about how Britain was in danger of being inundated by an alien culture. We construed that to mean that if you werent white, Anglo-Saxon, middle-class, Protestant, maybe you didnt fit in.

The reason we split up was quite classic. The drummer and I were both students at the London School of Economics. We had our finals coming up, but got an offer of a 20 -gig tour with another band. Our singer insists it was The Specials, but Im not “sure hes got one”. However, our Pakistani roots reasserted themselves and we chose wed better concentrate on passing our finals.

I loved what the band did, but I knew I wasnt going to make a living from it. After getting my masters degree, I started working for BP as an economist. I didnt know much about finance it was quite an arcane, closed industry but when Thatcher liberalised and deregulated large parts of the British economy, she set off a revolution in financial services. It seemed an obvious move to induce, from oil into finance, so I joined Merrill Lynch, where I spent 21 years.

Ausaf
Ausaf Abbas now. Photo: Alan Powdrill for the Guardian

The money I earn does allow me to do some good one of my friends worked for Amnesty International and knew I was an investment banker. He called me up and said, Hi. I need you to send me 1,000, otherwise 12 people will die in Colombia tomorrow. I agreed immediately. I stumbled into investment banking by chance, but I love the opportunities it has given me. Ive satisfied prime ministers and finance ministers and CEOs of major firms. This was unbelievable for an immigrant child who grew up in Brixton in a single-parent family.

Im sure my 20 -year-old self would look at me and call, Sellout! But I dont feel like a sellout. Im simply older and wiser. Im 55 now. Im old, fat and bald. When I tell people I was in a punk band, most merely laugh and think Im joking. But Im very proud of what we did. In our own route, we helped Asian children stand up and be counted for the first time in this country. Why wouldnt you be proud of that?

Lesley Woods, 56

Then: singer/ guitarist, Au Pairs

Now: barrister

Lesley
Lesley Woods got into punk in 1978. Photo: Alan Powdrill for the Guardian

I was a late starter. Punk had been around quite a while when I got into it, in 1978. What was genuinely appealing was sticking two thumbs up at rock musicians. People could get up and do their thing without having to be these great, macho leading guitarists. And females could do it on their own terms, without having to conform to some female stereotype of having big boobs and being really pretty. People like Siouxsie Sioux, Poly Styrene and Patti Smith were great role models.

But we were constantly met with a wall of violence and aggressivenes. There were fightings ;[ Slits singer] Ari Up get stabbed. There comes a point where you cant go on any more at that level. After the band folded, my brain was quite scrambled and I needed to get my intellect back, so I guessed Id do something really difficult and started examining law.

Lesley
Lesley Woods now. Photo: Alan Powdrill for the Guardian

I was called to the bar when I was 32. I started off doing asylum law, working with refugees, which tallied with my political values. Although it was heartbreaking a lot of the time, when you won a instance, you came out and yelped for exhilaration. You knew youd made a difference. I do very little asylum law now, but I still work in immigration. Ive always had a very strong sense of justice, and working in this area entails I havent had to compromise my integrity.

People were aware of my past and it probably set a lot of the more straight people off. When I first came to the bar in 1992, girls couldnt wear trousers, which gives you an idea of how backward it was.

I still muck about with music, but I wished Id paid more heed to that particular itching about five or 10 years ago. My work is so intense that its hard to fit music in now. Ive been building new records and I still do the odd performance. Id love to do some cooperations, though. Its a bit lonely doing it on your own.

Terry Chimes, 59

Then: drummer, The Clash

Now: chiropractor

Terry
Terry Chimes, middle, during the course of its days in The Clash. Photograph: Alan Powdrill for the Guardian

I just wanted to be in a band, and this was the most exciting band I could find. Everyone else in The Clash was angry at the world and the creation. I wasnt. Thats why I left, actually. I felt like the odd one out.

As a child, I wanted to be a doctor, but I also wanted to be a musician; its various kinds of hard to be both. The part of me that wanted to be a musician won that particular combat you have to do music when youre young. But by the time Id done it for 15 years[ playing with Black Sabbath and Hanoi Rocks as well as The Clash ], I was craving working in medicine more and more, so I built the big jump. In 1988, at 32, I stopped music and spent five years analyzing full-time. My musical peers werent that astounded. The Clashs manager Bernie Rhodes once said, Youre like some young physician. I can imagine you saying, Here are your pills, madam. I dont know where he got that from, but hed spotted something.

Terry
Terry Chimes now. Photo: Alan Powdrill for the Guardian

During my time in music, I saw how peoples health was determined by their lifestyle. I had a strong urge to mend people. Ive now watched more than 45,000 patients, so Ive made a lot of people better. If you dont like people, then its the job from hell. I treat a lot of musicians. They say, Id rather come to you. Youre a musician and you understand what I do. Some patients are interested in music and like to have a chat about it, but most just say, Im in agony. Can you please get rid of it?

The experience of challenging and changing the creation was good for everyone at the time. Whatever you do after that you bring that with you: the sense that things dont have to be the style they are. I have another life now, standing up against massive corporations that wishes to ruin everyones health and make money out of it, whether with genetically-modified food, sugar-laden rubbish or narcotics we dont genuinely need.

People say to me, Dont you miss playing in front of 70, 000 people? Well, Ill likely held 70,000 patients before I succumb. Get people well and constructing them happy: I dont think Ill ever want to stop doing that.

The Strange Case Of Dr Terry And Mr Chimes by Terry Chimes is published by John Blake at 9.99.

David OBrien, 54

Then: part of Manchesters punk scene

Now: vicar

David
David OBrien: punk “ve dedicated me” an energy. Photo: Alan Powdrill for the Guardian

As a teen, I dropped in and out of jobs in factories and supermarkets without having much direction, but punk gave me an energy. I wasnt an anarchist. I wanted society to stop and think about alternative solutions idea. Plus, I felt comfy in Doc Martens boots and bleached jeans.

I was an illegitimate child. My daddy was an alcoholic whom I hadnt assured since I was four and my mother was a single mother who had eight children, although she lost two of them. She brought the six of us up by herself.

Growing up, Christianity was irrelevant to me. I used to drink too much and get into difficulty at football matches. The closest I got to venerate was standing at the Stretford End on a Saturday at Old Trafford.

I guessed church was for nice, middle-aged people like Thora Hird. I recollect carol vocalists coming into the pub one Christmas and, like everybody else, I was drunk and barracking them. One day, when I was on the dole and had just got my giro, me and my mate went to the barroom until we got chucked out at 3pm in those days. We were strolling through some timbers when we ensure an occult sign cut out of the ground; the rumor was that a coven was employing it for black magic. Id had a bit to drink, so I jumped into the middle to ensure what happened.

I didnt feel right afterwards. It frightened me and got the cogs turning with the issue: what if there is something else out there? So I picked up a transcript of the New Testament that had been on the shelf for years, collecting dust, and I felt better after read it. It still took me three years to get inside an actual church.

I had this nagging believe for the next 10 years: Become a minister. Become a minister. So I enrolled on a one-year foundation course in theology, then completed a certain degree in applied theology. Five and a half years ago, I came down to Shrewsbury and became a fully-fledged vicar.

David
David OBrien now. Photo: Alan Powdrill for the Guardian

When you put on a dog collar, people assume youve had no life before. But the passions that got me into punk are still there, and thats what I bring into ministry now. Its about a passion for meaning.

I havent got my vinyl any more, but I still listen to one or two things on YouTube. Its a reminder of where Ive come from.

David OBriens book Northern Soul: Football, Punk, Jesus is published by Onwards and Upwards at 8.99.

Steve Ignorant, 58

Then: lead singer, Crass

Now: lifeboatman

Steve
Steve Ignorant was the lead singer for Crass from 1977 to 1984. Photo: Alan Powdrill for the Guardian

Punk had a purpose. Every gig is beneficial for something: a rape crisis centre, a donkey sanctuary, an old people home. It was positive. We wanted a nice world to live in. Only, this time, we werent asking “were in” telling.

From 1977 to 1984, I was the lead vocalist for Crass. We toured the UK, playing gigs wherever and whenever we could. When Crass finished, I continued to perform and record with Conflict and later formed the bands Schwartzeneggar and Stratford Mercenaries.

In 2007, I moved to Norfolk with the intention of living softly by the coast. I was going to sweep up foliages and all that sort of stuff but it wasnt to be. The year I moved, I got an offer to do two nights at Shepherds Bush Empire. With every gig I do, I like to donate to a cause. I knew the independent lifeboat serving in Sea Palling is always desperate for funds, so I thought that was ideal: I could see where the money actually runs. They got about 1,000 and bought new life jackets that went on to save people lives.

The crew took me out on the barge, dressed me up in a drysuit, hurled me overboard and picked me up, then asked, So, what about joining?

At first, I was very reluctant I worried about specific commitments and imagined that I would have to go on procession. The notion of some bloke appearing me up and down and telling me off for not shaving properly went totally against my principles. But they were all scruffier than me. Now Im a full-time member.

Steve
Steve Ignorant now. Photo: Alan Powdrill for the Guardian

Being part of the crew is similar to being in a band. Youre full of adrenaline when youre on stage, but the worst thing that can happen is that you forget the words or the lead guitarist plays a bum note. Its not the same adrenaline when youre abruptly out at sea and pulling someone from the water. It affects different people in different ways. It doesnt construct me at first, but about an hour afterwards, its as if Ive taken amphetamines. I cant shut up about it.

Jordan, 60

Then: punk style icon

Now: veterinary nurse

Jordan
Jordan operated at the vanguard of punk. Photo: Alan Powdrill for the Guardian

People said, You must be so brave, looking like that out in the street. Id often wear a mohair jumper with suspenders and stockings and see-through knickers. It was nothing to do with gallantry. Quite the opposite. It was about feeling comfortable and at one with yourself. I always liked garmenting my own style. When I came up to London to try to get a job at Vivienne Westwood and Malcolm McLarens shop, Sex, I was already wearing the stuff the latter are selling I had just cobbled it together myself. But there wasnt a task available straight away, so in the meantime I went to work in Harrods with green makeup on.

I eventually ran right at the forefront of punk with Vivienne and Malcolm. I styled the Sex Pistols messing up their clothes. I appeared on stage with them, including on their first Tv appearance on Granadas So It Goes, to give weight to their performance fashion-wise. I also managed Adam And The Ants during their punk era.

A lot of the major music moguls is very much sexist. An A& R guy once said to my face, This is not a womans undertaking. You should be cooking and laying on your back. I didnt want to be there any more, so I came home to Seaford.

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Madonna creates $7.5 m for Malawi and criticises Trump at Miami show

Singer says predicament of Native Americans constructs her ashamed to be an American at benefit performance and auction

Madonna has repeatedly criticised Donald Trump and said she is ashamed to be an American, in a performance and auction in Miami that created more than $7.5 m( 5.9 m) for her Malawi foundation.

Images of the president-elect appeared behind her as she sang the line You know that youre toxic from her cover of the Britney Spears hit.

The singer also uncovered she had once been in Trumps bed for a publication photoshoot when the tycoon was not at home. She took a shot at his cheap sheets, saying: They wont be Egyptian cotton because we all know how he feels about Muslims, dont we?

Madonna covers Toxic

Madonna also spoke about the plight of Native Americans and asked why their land was being destroyed. It just really induces me feel ashamed ashamed to be an American, ashamed to be a human being, really, she said before performing her 2003 hit American Life.

The benefit show, billed as an evening of music, art and mischief, find Madonna resuscitate her cabaret display, Tears of a Clown, first performed in Australia earlier this year.

It was one of the many parties held during Art Basel Miami Beach, the biggest art carnival in North America, which attracts super-rich art collectors and celebrities from across the world. Guests, who paid at least $5,000 to attend, included Leonardo DiCaprio, Chris Rock, Dave Chappelle, former boyfriend Alex Rodriguez, Courtney Love and James Corden.

Before her hour-long performance, Madonna auctioned pieces from her personal art collect, including a Tracey Emin print that sold for $550,000 and three Herb Ritts photographs from her 1985 bridal to Sean Penn that fetched $230,000.

Other plenties included a Damien Hirst painting, a private performance by the magician David Blaine, who also attended, and a week-long stay at DiCaprios home in Palm Springs that went for $140,000.

Penn bid on several items when the auction stalled. At one point, Madonna walked into the audience, climbed on tables and dedicated one man a lap dance. She abruptly stood up at another point, grabbed the chair on which she had performed and said she also want to get auction it , noting $600 could send a girl in Malawi to secondary school. The chair sold for $10,000.

Madonna adopted her 11 -year-old son, David, from an orphanage in Malawi more than a decade ago. At the time, she said she didnt know where Malawi was. David had pneumonia and malaria. His mom died in childbirth and his siblings were also dead.

He was at the event to introduces the singer, telling the audience: I realise Im one of the luck ones.

Madonna depicted videos of Malawi, asking for help to build a paediatric surgery and intensive care unit at a hospital there. Half the population are under the age of 15, according to her foundation, Raising Malawi.

As well as political statements and corny buffoon jokes, Madonna lamented the fact she was very single and had not had sexuality for some time.

The Associated Press contributed to this report .

Read more: www.theguardian.com